Narrowing the Path to Public School Diversity Federal Appeals Court Ruling against a Boston High School That Used Race as a Factor in Admissions May Reshape Secondary-School Policies and Affect Desegregation Cases

By Kris Axtman, writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, November 23, 1998 | Go to article overview
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Narrowing the Path to Public School Diversity Federal Appeals Court Ruling against a Boston High School That Used Race as a Factor in Admissions May Reshape Secondary-School Policies and Affect Desegregation Cases


Kris Axtman, writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


The question is one of the most sensitive in America today: How far should schools go in promoting diversity?

Boston Latin School, a prestigious public high school, thought it had the answer, admitting half its students based solely on grades and entrance-test scores and the other half weighted by race. In fact, the publicly funded exam school also valued diversity enough to go to court over it.

But last week a federal appeals court ruled that Boston Latin's race-based admissions policies were illegal - a decision with important implications for the debate over affirmative action nationwide. As the country's first ruling on the constitutionality of racial preferences at the high school level, the decision is expected to force many public-school administrators to rethink their policies - at least for magnet and other specialized schools where admissions policies are stricter. At the same time, the ruling adds to a growing body of legal opinion that says schools must be very careful in using racial diversity as a factor in admissions. Indeed, the Boston Latin ruling comes on the heels of a 1996 federal appeals court ruling against the University of Texas at Austin, which said diversity in education is not a compelling government interest. Implications for desegregation Many people considered that decision by the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals just an aberration by a conservative tribunal. But the ruling by the more liberal First Circuit Court of Appeals adds weight to the growing backlash against the use of diversity in admissions - and could even affect desegregation cases. "Many are wondering whether the {1978} unanimous Supreme Court opinion that ruled schools could take account of race in order to diversify still survives in light of recent court rulings," says Robert Post, a professor of law at the University of California, Berkeley. The ruling in Boston, a city that has gone through wrenching court-ordered desegregation, stems from a lawsuit by a white family whose daughter was denied admission to Boston Latin.

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Narrowing the Path to Public School Diversity Federal Appeals Court Ruling against a Boston High School That Used Race as a Factor in Admissions May Reshape Secondary-School Policies and Affect Desegregation Cases
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