Religion and Art Meet on Canvas

By Gloria Goodale, Arts and culture correspondent of The Christian ScienceMonitor | The Christian Science Monitor, February 19, 1999 | Go to article overview

Religion and Art Meet on Canvas


Gloria Goodale, Arts and culture correspondent of The Christian ScienceMonitor, The Christian Science Monitor


When artist Larry Rivers painted the triptych mural "History of Matzah: The Story of the Jews," he had more than art on his mind.

"I decided I was entering my serious period, that I would do something on my people," said the painter, whose birth name is Yitzroch Loiza Grossberg. Rivers is sometimes known as the father of Pop Art for the seminal work he did with figurative imagery some four decades ago.

The three massive canvases, accompanied by preparatory drawings and text on view at the Skirball Cultural Center here, were painted as a commission some 15 years ago. They are replete with recognizable images of Jewish history from Moses through the 1920s. The first looks at the biblical times, the second at European Jews, and the third at Jewish immigration to the United States. This show is only the fourth time the murals have been displayed publicly since they were completed. Rivers said at the time that he felt his career "took a hit" for having gone off into history and personal biography, particularly using such specific, didactic imagery as Moses and Jewish immigrants coming to Ellis Island. Indeed, reviews were mixed at the time. One critic praised the works for their wit and wisdom while another derided them as nothing more than illustrated books of Jewish history. Times have changed. Today, the art world embraces the use of personal biography, in which easily understandable narratives stand as a statement of artistic identity. His work is finding a different audience, one that is more willing to entertain the idea that deeper meaning is still possible even if a work of art can be easily understood at first viewing. It also raises questions that many in the art world have begun to take more seriously again in recent years, such as, what is the role of art in religious life? And what is the proper venue for showcasing a work of art? "We're so conditioned to see art only in museums," says Donna DeSalvo, curator at large for the Wexner Center for the Arts in Columbus, Ohio. …

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