Music Technology Lets You Create a Symphony - for a Song at the Annual Music Expo, Traditional Woodwinds and Brass Were Joinedby the Hot New Instrument for the Next Century: Computers

By Wood, Daniel B. | The Christian Science Monitor, February 2, 1999 | Go to article overview

Music Technology Lets You Create a Symphony - for a Song at the Annual Music Expo, Traditional Woodwinds and Brass Were Joinedby the Hot New Instrument for the Next Century: Computers


Wood, Daniel B., The Christian Science Monitor


Stop the music.

I have just seen the future of symphony, pop, and jazz.

Picture it: The strains of violins rise from your living room, as a computer performs your original concerto - complete with oboe and timpani. It's much simpler than trying to cram a full orchestra into your house. Other technology lets you hold a live jam session with guitarists in Denmark or drummers in Taiwan. You can even direct a music video from the privacy of your own home. And all of it can be recorded on new digital-quality, miniature compact discs - suitable for mailing to Grandma, or a record exec. Much of this technology has been available for years, but plummeting prices are putting such possibilities increasingly within the budgets of ordinary consumers, schools, and garage bands with dreams of superstardom. All it takes is a tune - and $50 to $2,000. And, music executives say, while computers may never put Steinway out of business, more and more musicians are turning to technology. "It used to be that computers and musical software were the smallest part of this show. Now they're pushing traditional instrumentation aside," said James Byfield, marketing manager for ThinkWare, a distributor that represents about 150 companies specializing in "next generation music technology." Judging by the buzz of buyers here at NAMM - the yearly exposition of the International Music Products Association - Mr. Byfield can't be far off. The world's top association of retailers and manufacturers of music related products, NAMM is a one-stop, carnival of an exposition for the worldwide music industry. Four days' worth of conferences, workshops, and exhibitions attracted about 60,000 insiders from the music industry. A large majority of those folks fall into two groups: those who wear three-piece suits, designer eyeglasses, and pony tails, and those who look like Rolling Stones guitarist Keith Richards at 6 a.m. There is also the crush of crowds trying to hear sales pitches above the din generated by people sampling 12 football fields' worth of cellos, drums and Aboriginal didgeridoos.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Music Technology Lets You Create a Symphony - for a Song at the Annual Music Expo, Traditional Woodwinds and Brass Were Joinedby the Hot New Instrument for the Next Century: Computers
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.