Perfect Connections Bringing a Spiritual Perspective to Daily Life

The Christian Science Monitor, February 8, 1999 | Go to article overview

Perfect Connections Bringing a Spiritual Perspective to Daily Life


Our lives are full of important connections. Whether it's the wires through which electricity flows, or the chemistry of interpersonal relations, you'd probably say that when things go smoothly, connections are a good thing. Then again, when things aren't right, you may be tempted to view life as a series of disconnects.

In the realm of the material, what crisply links up one day may corrode, erode, snap, or tear apart the next. We may even get to a point where we feel insecure just because things might let us down later.

But a new way of looking at connections takes away this sense of their fragility. It is the spiritual view of all true activity as centered in God. Spiritually speaking, everything that has being is connected solely to the creator, and expresses God. In God, all is perfect and integral. Electricity seems to come into a home or business from an external energy source; it runs along wires connecting this distant source to an object, such as a lamp or computer. But this apparently entirely material process can point to something higher. Spiritually viewed, the source of all energy is the divine Spirit. This supreme source of energy needs no connections to bridge any gulf of separation. Spirit is omnipresent, everywhere. The real source of energy for all creation is God, and the outpouring of divine energy is totally harmless, useful, and utterly dependable. Knowing this spiritual fact can help! At one crucial time, prayer helped me grasp this truth of energy as spiritual. And the immediate result of this understanding was the reconnection of wiring on some sound equipment that two engineers had previously failed to fix for an increasingly irate client. Understanding connectedness in a more spiritual way is also helpful when human relationships are strained. We may find our hearts broken, or feel the void of no genuine connectedness to family, friends, or neighbors. Spiritually viewed, however, the one relationship everyone truly has is with divine Love, a universal source of affection that is unwavering. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Perfect Connections Bringing a Spiritual Perspective to Daily Life
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.