Which Kids Shows Make the Grade? Network Executives and Child Advocates Weigh in on Children'sprogramming

By Gloria Goodale Arts and culture correspondent of The Christian ScienceMonitor | The Christian Science Monitor, January 22, 1999 | Go to article overview

Which Kids Shows Make the Grade? Network Executives and Child Advocates Weigh in on Children'sprogramming


Gloria Goodale Arts and culture correspondent of The Christian ScienceMonitor, The Christian Science Monitor


It's midterm exam time for schoolkids around the country, and if there's any place many of those students would rather be, it's in front of the television.

On behalf of the sorely tested children who might try to make the argument that TV is a teaching tool too, the Monitor rounded up a group of industry observers - children's advocates, network executives, and parents - to provide its own midterm report card on how well broadcasters are actually doing to make that time spent in front of the TV educational and informational.

This evaluation focuses on what's been dubbed "FCC-friendly" programming - shows that ostensibly fulfill the congressionally mandated requirement that all stations air a three-hour minimum weekly dose of educational or informational (E/I) programming. Stations must file quarterly reports to show how well they're providing this service - or risk losing their license from the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) at annual renewal time. First, some background. When the Children's Television Act first passed in 1990, the law simply required that stations fulfill the educational and informational needs of children ages 2 to 16. When stations submitted the animated shows "The Jetsons" and "The Flintstones," claiming they were aids in understanding other time periods, supporters realized there was more work to do. Refinements to the rules, passed in 1996, created a category of core educational programming that must have the significant purpose of educating children, a clearly stated educational objective, and a target age. It must also be at least 30 minutes long, have a regular time slot, and air between 7 a.m. and 10 p.m. So, without any further digression, the envelope please ... "As a former professor, I would give the networks as a whole around a B-minus," says Kathryn Montgomery, president of New York's Center for Media Education (CME), an advocacy group that spearheaded the 1996 refinements to the rules. Ms. Montgomery says that the networks' overall performance is adequate at best. Montgomery acknowledges a few bright spots, such as "Squigglevision," part of ABC's Saturday morning lineup, but maintains that, overall, networks "are grudgingly going along with this requirement." The Annenberg Public Policy Center at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia published a review of roughly 1,000 programs in June, grading them from best to worst (see story, above right). Senior research investigator Amy Jordan agrees with the overall CME grade of B-minus and explains her most serious concerns. "We're most disappointed in the lack of diversity in the programs," she says, noting that the vast majority of programs are geared toward the social and emotional needs of children as opposed to their cognitive and intellectual counterparts. Indeed, a recent CME study showed 25 of the top 29 programs submitted for consideration are socially, not intellectually, oriented. "The spirit of the rules was to get more substantive shows," the researcher reflects, "with more science and history." Instead, Ms. Jordan observes, the networks are taking what she calls the cheapest, easiest path. "These {socially oriented} shows appeal to the widest demographic." The networks themselves are unusually clear-sighted in their own evaluations. CBS Television president Leslie Moonves, in an uncharacteristically modest moment, gives the oldest network "a solid B" for its performance. …

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Which Kids Shows Make the Grade? Network Executives and Child Advocates Weigh in on Children'sprogramming
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