Today, NAFTA; Maana, Europe! Say Mexico Traders President Zedillo and EU Push Pact for Freer Trade and Less Dependencyon the US

By Howard LaFranchi, writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, April 6, 1999 | Go to article overview
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Today, NAFTA; Maana, Europe! Say Mexico Traders President Zedillo and EU Push Pact for Freer Trade and Less Dependencyon the US


Howard LaFranchi, writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


Nobody relishes being at the weak end of a lopsided relationship. So, after decades of relying heavily on the United States for an export market and for financial help in a pinch, Mexico is casting its hopes across the Atlantic.

Under the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), most of Mexico's exports go to the US, and Mexico was rescued during its 1995 peso crisis by Washington.

Now Mexico is pushing hard for a free-trade agreement with the European Union (EU). The presidency of Carlos Salinas de Gortari is remembered for breaking ideological taboos to sign NAFTA. President Ernesto Zedillo wants to be remembered as the president who diversified Mexico's commercial and political partnerships. Seeking an accord with the EU on free trade "is the most important foreign policy initiative of the Zedillo presidency," says Augustn Gutirrez Canet, dean of international studies at Mexico City's Universidad Iberoamericana. "Mexico would be foolish not to take advantage of being neighbor to the largest and most dynamic economy in the world, but at the same time the overconcentration of our economic ties with the United States is not healthy," says Mr. Gutirrez. Concluding a free-trade agreement with the EU "will be the cornerstone of a more balanced international relationship in Mexico's globalization process." Central America represents a small part of Mexico's trade. But Mexico already has agreements with Nicaragua and Costa Rica. It is expected to complete an agreement with Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras, and Panama in June. The EU and Mexico began formal negotiations toward a free-trade agreement last November, after having discussed the idea since 1995. Recently President Zedillo said that the talks were going very well, and that an agreement by the end of the year looked possible. But that was before last month's abrupt resignation of the EU's full executive commission, causing a crisis that analysts say could delay EU business like the Mexico negotiations. The EU is banking on Mexico as its showcase entry into the growing Latin American market.

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