Two Arabs Who Help Run Israel Parliamentarians Share a Hometown and the Goal of Palestinian Rights

By Ilene R. Prusher, Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, June 17, 1999 | Go to article overview

Two Arabs Who Help Run Israel Parliamentarians Share a Hometown and the Goal of Palestinian Rights


Ilene R. Prusher, Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


He wants to fight the system. She's trying to work within it. He's a political firebrand. She's a quiet crusader for equality.

Ahmed Tibi and Hosnia Jabara were born in the same year in this same town - a half hour northeast of Tel Aviv - 41 years ago. They went through the same schools. And they are now freshmen in the same Knesset, Israel's parliament.

But they followed very different paths to Jerusalem. Dr. Tibi was elected last month on the slate of a new nationalist Arab party that wants Israel to forgo its character as a Jewish state and become a state of all its citizens. Ms. Jabara joined Meretz, a secular left-wing party that's characterized as Zionist, though it favors Palestinian rights and eventual statehood, and became the first Arab woman to be elected to the Israeli legislature. While Jabara's seat has been welcomed as a victory for the country's most underprivileged and underrepresented citizens, Tibi's presence in the Knesset already has him embroiled in conflict. For the past six years, he's been a paid political adviser to Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat. He even negotiated on behalf of the Palestinians during peace talks at Wye Plantation in Maryland last fall. To Israeli Jews who still harbor doubts over Arabs' loyalty to the state, Tibi's rsum is a particularly egregious case in point. By serving Mr. Arafat at a time when Israeli and Palestinian interests have seemed so diametrically opposed, he was, in effect, working for the enemy. Now, he wants to be assigned to one of Israel's most confidential clubs: the Knesset Foreign Affairs and Defense Committee, whose members are regularly given top-secret briefings on Israel's most sensitive military, strategic, and security matters. Right-wing Israeli politicians say that's out of the question. They charge that Tibi's alliance with Arafat rules out his eligibility to hear top-level updates by Israeli intelligence officials. Tibi says that he should be allowed on the committee as an Israeli citizen democratically elected to the Knesset. And on this - as on all matters of equality for Jews and Arabs in Israel - his former classmate, Jabara, agrees. But they concur on little else, especially on the way to achieve some of the same goals: peace with the Palestinians in the West Bank and Gaza, and equal rights for Arabs in Israel. Tibi and Jabara epitomize the ongoing identity crisis of the country's 1 million citizens who are Arab - about 1 in 6 Israelis: Whether to identify primarily with Palestinian nationalism, or to focus on getting a fair share of the pie as an ethnic minority in the Jewish state. Working from outside, or within Even the language they speak is different. In interviews with both Knesset members, he talks about representing Palestinian Arabs in Israel, and she talks about eliminating the gaps between Jews and the "Arab sector," the terminology Israelis have preferred for decades. Tibi says his position as a Palestinian Arab who holds Israel citizenship made him uniquely qualified to serve as an adviser to Arafat. Tibi was introduced to the chairman of the Palestine Liberation Organization in Tunisia in 1984. Tibi was fascinated by Arafat, and Arafat was eager to hear the politically astute Tibi's insights on Israeli politics. He's remained in contact with Arafat since, going on the Palestinian Authority's payroll after the Oslo Accords were signed in 1993. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Two Arabs Who Help Run Israel Parliamentarians Share a Hometown and the Goal of Palestinian Rights
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.