Filming China's Tumultuous Past

By Gloria Goodale, Arts and culture correspondent of The Christian Science | The Christian Science Monitor, May 28, 1999 | Go to article overview

Filming China's Tumultuous Past


Gloria Goodale, Arts and culture correspondent of The Christian Science, The Christian Science Monitor


Chinese actress Joan Chen is not physically present in her latest film, "Xiu-Xiu: The Sent-Down Girl." It is her debut as a director.

What gives the film much of its power emanates from a heady mix of the earthy and exotic that has marked Ms. Chen's on-screen performances and garnered her international attention in the years since she left her native China.

Today, the actress's dress is low-key and casual, befitting her new role as film auteur. She is equally at ease as she discusses the practical as well as poetic aspects of filmmaking. "Directing let me discover the versatility of film language," she says. "You can use realism or poetry, and the language can be symbolic or abstract," she says in almost the same breath as she bemoans the lack of any food on the Tibetan location of her film except the ubiquitous yak meat. Now based in San Francisco, the actress-director is perhaps best known as the beautiful and spoiled favorite wife to the title character in Bernardo Bertolucci's "The Last Emperor." She began her career in the West in the 1985 TV movie "Tai-Pan." As at least one critic has noted, for more than a decade Chen has been excellent in good movies and amusing in bad ones ("Judge Dredd," "On Deadly Ground"). In 1996, after a stint on a film-prize jury in Berlin, she decided it was time to tell a deeper story about her own generation in China. "The films {in Berlin} were all about the end of the millennium and urban despair," she recalls. "Suddenly, I got the urge to do a film of my own, a more hopeful, poetic one." Chen was inspired by a 1994 novel by her longtime friend Yan Geling about a girl who is "relocated" as part of the Chinese government's attempt to restructure society during the Cultural Revolution some three decades ago. Chen wanted to do something that would commemorate what she calls the "lost generation," the last to come of age during that tumultuous time in China's history. "The revolution was so big and complex," she says after a recent screening of the film. "There have been very few films that really explore the impact of that time, my time. I wanted to do something that would show the wastefulness, how the young were thrown away." During the Cultural Revolution (1966-76), roughly 7.5 million adolescents were taken from their homes and sent to the countryside for what the government called retraining. …

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