At Anytown, Teens Tackle Racism, Biases

By David Holmstrom, writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, July 28, 1999 | Go to article overview

At Anytown, Teens Tackle Racism, Biases


David Holmstrom, writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


The clincher is the $1 bill.

"Anybody who wants this dollar can come and get it," says the group facilitator, holding the money up.

With some 50 high school students - black, Latino, Asian, white, and mixed race - standing in a large conference room, a white girl at the front quickly steps forward and claims the money.

This is a key symbolic event at the 15th annual summer gathering of Anytown New England, an unusual, week-long diversity, education, and leadership program for teens sponsored by the National Conference for Community and Justice (NCCJ).

On the second day, the students - standing shoulder to shoulder - were peppered with a list of 30 questions designed to separate them according to privileges or discrimination they may have experienced because of race, income or social position.

"If your family had to move because they couldn't afford the rent, take one step back," says the questioner. "If your family owns their own house, one step forward... If your family has ever been on a vacation out of the country, step forward....."

When the questions end, most of the white students are at the front. A scattering of whites, blacks, and Asians are in the middle, and at the back, almost all are blacks, Latinos, and Asians.

The effects of racism

The dollar bill, when offered, is easily taken by a white girl at the front, symbolizing white privilege and access, another "have" ahead of the "have nots."

What follows is a two-hour discussion that at times is heated and emotional, with equal expressions of guilt, denial, and confusion. A handful of students cry, many realizing for the first time the impact of individual and institutional racism on them and their families. Many reach out across racial lines and seek constructive connections. Others are brooding.

Tania Asnes, at the front, tells the group as a Jewish student, "I feel kind of bad, but it's not like I did anything, like I should feel I've been walking around on a red carpet, but I looked back and I saw Savoun (Vath) sitting back there. We were talking today and we have a lot in common, and I thought, wait a minute; why am I up here and she's back there?"

Later, as the discussion proceeds Tania quietly moves to the back, and puts her arm around Savoun who is crying, and remembering her family's struggles in fleeing Cambodia and arriving in the US with little money.

Nathalie Keng, co-director says, "Our goal is to develop leaders who care about diversity and social justice. We are not trying to make the world diverse: it is diverse, and here we come to grips with the biases and prejudices we all have."

In a time of much publicized hate crimes, Anytown dares go where many adults refuse to tread. "This program is about becoming a servant leader," says Anytown co-director Beau Basset, "and the chance to meet like this is not available to most adults, not even the chance to talk like this."

William Marcelin, a black participant, says, "It was rough at first. Some of them were thinking, OK, I'm privileged, but I'm willing to help, willing to tell other people we need to change. And the people at the back were saying, I don't have as much as they do, but they are good people, but I don't know about the people in the outside world."

For those who have been through Anytown here, or at 45 other US cities, the step forward or backward exercise is one of many during a week. …

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