The Changing Nature of Science, Theology, and Medicine ; at the Outset of the Millennium, Religion Was the Queen of The

By David K. Nartonis, | The Christian Science Monitor, December 16, 1999 | Go to article overview

The Changing Nature of Science, Theology, and Medicine ; at the Outset of the Millennium, Religion Was the Queen of The


David K. Nartonis,, The Christian Science Monitor


One of the most dramatic stories of the last thousand years is the evolution of Western culture from its medieval to its modern phase. This massive evolution of thought involved equally massive changes in Western science, theology, and medicine - changes that reached a crescendo at about the midpoint of the millennium and then gave our modern era some of its most distinctive characteristics.

A thousand years ago, theology was the

queen of the sciences, and only medicine, of these three, had an empirical and practical component. Gradually, however, as the medieval gave way to the modern, science detached itself from theology and drifted over into the same empirical and practical camp as medicine. This, in turn, marginalized theology, which became the discipline, left behind by changing ideas of science. It also changed medicine, the practical and empirical discipline as it became far more abstract in its embrace of impersonal science late in the millennium.

What was it about the massive shift from the medieval to the modern that brought about these changes in science, theology, and medicine? A major part of the answer must lie in what some scholars have called the "banishment of self."

Medieval thinkers saw the world as pervaded by self - the selves of men and women and the great Self of God. These selves were the only actors in the world with everything else passive and receptive. It was more than just an anthropomorphic sense of things. Personified motives were seen behind every activity. In such a world, theology was the queen of the sciences because it was a search for the great Self (God) behind all the world processes and behind all the lesser selves who also acted in this world. By mid- millennium, however, this medieval world view was already breaking down because of a shift to empirical observation and measurement. Men whom we now think of as early scientists - Galileo, Copernicus, Newton - began to view the world as an impersonal machine, rather than as the projection of some great Self or selves.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The Changing Nature of Science, Theology, and Medicine ; at the Outset of the Millennium, Religion Was the Queen of The
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.