Jazzing Up Parent-Teacher Conferences with a 'Narrative'

By Manning, Benadette | The Christian Science Monitor, October 5, 1999 | Go to article overview

Jazzing Up Parent-Teacher Conferences with a 'Narrative'


Manning, Benadette, The Christian Science Monitor


As a high school mathematics teacher, I spend a good deal of time preparing to meet parents and guardians at parent-teacher conferences every fall and spring. As a divorced parent of four young children, I also spend a good deal of time attending conferences myself. I am always surprised that not all parents go and that grades are the primary focus of meetings in the upper elementary grades.

In a recent conversation with a good friend, I mentioned that I think parents should attend all their children's conferences regardless of how their children seem to be doing. She told me that she doesn't go conferences anymore because her daughter usually does very well in school.

She said that typically a teacher only reported her daughter's recent grades on assignments, which she already knew because her daughter brought assignments home.

At my high school in Boston, we too were primarily reporting grades at the conferences. We found that when we gave them report cards, some parents concentrated on the letter grades, the implication of those grades in terms of getting into college, and what specific behavior led up to receiving the grades.

Some unhappy parents said, "I can't do anything to change this grade now," as if to say that we were wasting their time. In a way, they were right.

We struggled with what information we wanted to convey to parents that would benefit students in the long run. We wanted to discuss and exchange information about the children that was relevant to school performance. We wanted to discuss how children learn and make suggestions on ways parents and teachers can enhance students' learning.

In 1996, our school decided that all teachers should write "narrative" reports for each of their students. Over time, the school provided needed training, and teachers discussed what kind of information to include.

Because of the time involved, we now write reports for ninth- and 12th-graders in the fall; for 10th- and 11th-graders in the spring.

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