Despite Austrian Uproar, Hungary Courts Far-Right ; EU States Decry Jrg Haider, and Focus on Halting His Politics from Spreading to Eastern Europe

By Michael J. Jordan, | The Christian Science Monitor, February 24, 2000 | Go to article overview

Despite Austrian Uproar, Hungary Courts Far-Right ; EU States Decry Jrg Haider, and Focus on Halting His Politics from Spreading to Eastern Europe


Michael J. Jordan,, The Christian Science Monitor


Austria has been a steady target of criticism, and ostracism, since the formation earlier this month of a center-right coalition government that includes the Freedom Party of right-wing populist leader Jrg Haider.

In the latest instance yesterday, an Austrian cycling team was barred from a race in Belgium.

Mr. Haider has in the past praised aspects of Nazi rule, although he later apologized. His party has blamed immigrants and ethnic minorities for a variety of social and economic problems.

France and Portugal, the current European Union president, have been particularly outspoken, aiming to send a clear message to extremist politicians across Western and Eastern Europe that xenophobic and anti-Semitic views are beyond the pale, and that center-right parties seeking broader support should resist the temptation to woo them.

It is places such as Hungary that the EU has in mind. Prime Minister Viktor Orban, a feisty young conservative in his mid-30s, already enjoys a cozy relationship with Istvan Csurka and his small, ultra-right Hungarian Justice and Life Party (MIEP). Mr. Csurka is notorious for his coded and overtly anti-Semitic statements, and boasts of his friendship with French ultra-Conservative figure Jean- Marie Le Pen.

On Feb. 12, some 500 MIEP supporters demonstrated in front of the Austrian embassy in Budapest, chanting "Long Live Haider!" While the link with Csurka has actually cost Mr. Orban popularity with most Hungarians, analysts suspect the premier may be considering whether to make the alliance with MIEP official in the 2002 elections.

Orban has been conspicuous in his unwillingness to denounce neighboring Austria's political decision, even as Budapest continues to press for EU membership.

"Orban is learning that it would be impossible to form a government with Csurka. It's clear the EU would not accept it," says Istvan Hegedus, a former vice chairman of the Hungarian Parliament's foreign-affairs committee, who quit Orban's party in 1994 over its rightward shift.

Orban says the EU assault on Austria "surprised" him, as it "forces us all to think harder than usual about the deeper meaning of democracy." He was also quoted as saying Haider's emergence was like "a stone being thrown into an intellectually and politically stagnant pond. …

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