Ending Affirmative Action Proves Harder Than It Looks ; A Fierce US Debate over Racial Preferences Storms Florida, Where Backers of the Policy Are Mobilizing

By Warren Richey, writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, March 1, 2000 | Go to article overview

Ending Affirmative Action Proves Harder Than It Looks ; A Fierce US Debate over Racial Preferences Storms Florida, Where Backers of the Policy Are Mobilizing


Warren Richey, writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


When Florida Gov. Jeb Bush set out to end race and gender preferences in college admissions and state contracts last year, he called his plan One Florida.

Perhaps it was wishful thinking on Mr. Bush's part. But his anti- affirmative action plan has instead spotlighted two, quite distinct, Floridas. On one side are those who favor the use of state preferences to boost opportunities for minorities and women, and on the other are those who oppose their continued use.

It is an increasingly acrimonious rift, one that is firmly establishing Florida as the nation's next major battleground over affirmative action.

And, analysts say, one that could complicate the Florida campaign of Bush's brother, George, in his anticipated run for the White House this fall.

Nowhere has the divide in the state been more apparent than in the capital, Tallahassee, earlier this week. On Tuesday, as the governor delivered his State of the State address to a largely supportive Republican-controlled state legislature, an estimated 11,000 protesters from across Florida stood outside in the sun- baked heat denouncing the governor as an enemy of the civil rights movement.

Many waved placards reading "Jeb Crow," and "Pharaoh Bush."

But if the governor was worried, he gave no indication.

Florida Republicans, including the governor, are counting on the support of a "silent majority" of Floridians presumed to be supportive of Bush's One Florida plan.

And some analysts suggest that, if the Republican Party holds firm on the issue, it stands to gain from crossover Democrats and independents who are also opposed to affirmative action.

But other analysts say that view is overly optimistic.

"Jeb Bush may have just cooked it for his brother in Florida," says Randall Berg, a Miami civil rights lawyer. "I think he grossly underestimated the animosity he would generate from minorities and women."

Voters narrowly split on issue

While polls last year suggested that an overwhelming majority of Floridians oppose the use of racial preferences in public education, public employment, and public contracts, other more recent polls show that likely voters in the state may be more closely divided on the issue.

A statewide poll released on Sunday by the Lakeland Ledger says that 44 percent of Florida voters support Bush's One Florida plan, while 40 percent prefer retaining affirmative action. Sixteen percent had no opinion.

Bush's One Florida initiative grew out of an attempt by the governor to sidestep a much more sweeping anti-affirmative-action campaign by a black California businessman, Ward Connerly.

The Connerly campaign, a statewide ballot initiative, would rewrite Florida's Constitution to bar any use of racial or gender preferences by the state government, including college admissions.

Mr. Connerly, an opponent of affirmative action who has taken his message on the road, has waged similar, successful campaigns in California and Washington State. …

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Ending Affirmative Action Proves Harder Than It Looks ; A Fierce US Debate over Racial Preferences Storms Florida, Where Backers of the Policy Are Mobilizing
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