Violence Dips in Nation's Schools ; Decline in Shootings Attributed to Vigorous, but Often Questioned, Safety Measures

By Craig Savoye, | The Christian Science Monitor, June 13, 2000 | Go to article overview

Violence Dips in Nation's Schools ; Decline in Shootings Attributed to Vigorous, but Often Questioned, Safety Measures


Craig Savoye,, The Christian Science Monitor


As school bells across the country peal for the last time this academic year, another sound has been mercifully absent from most classrooms and hallways: the crackle of gunfire.

This year, for the first time in seven years, no fatal mass shootings took place in US schools. Though individual tragedies did occur, even the number of singular incidents was down - a testament, experts say, to growing vigilance about safety in schools.

"It's very encouraging," says Ronald Stephens, executive director of the National School Safety Center in Westlake Village, Calif. "The numbers demonstrate how school safety has been placed on the educational agenda in more and more schools across the country. That's a major shift in the strategic educational climate."

So far, there have been nine shooting fatalities on schoolyards in the 1999-2000 academic year. That's down from 23 the year before, the year of Columbine, and 35 in 1997-98. Forty-three were recorded in 1992-93.

While experts caution against reading too much into the numbers for the narrow category of schoolyard homicides, they coincide with an overall drop in violence - particularly in many urban districts.

Federal figures show that the total number of reported school crimes declined by almost one-third - from 3.8 million to 2.7 million - between 1993 and 1997. While more recent comprehensive statistics aren't available, anecdotal evidence suggests assaults, weapons confiscations, and other indicators of crime continue to drop in many districts. For instance:

*Violence in Miami-Dade County, Fla., schools declined this year for the fifth year in a row. Crimes, including gun-related incidents, are down 23 percent since 1995.

*In Portland, Ore., gun confiscations and the number of students expelled for carrying weapons has been down substantially from a year ago.

*In Alabama, fewer students have been calling a statewide hotline to report problems that might lead to school violence.

To be sure, none of this is to suggest that the nation's schools are complete safe havens. In December, a 13-year-old boy opened fire on his classmates in Muskogee, Okla., wounding five of them. Bomb scares and threatening graffiti have become commonplace across the country in the year since Columbine.

What progress has been made on violence, experts say, is attributable to growing awareness of the problem among parents, administrators, and teachers. They also cite an arsenal of security measures - metal detectors, student ID badges, surveillance cameras, hall security monitors - as well as broader societal trends, including a booming economy that is generally associated with a lower adult crime rate.

"I believe the decrease is related to the fact that we're starting to pay more attention to kids' frustrations and anxieties, and developing more programs like conflict resolution and increasing the number of counselors and social workers and school-within-a- school programs," says Kevin Dwyer, president of the National Association of School Psychologists.

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Violence Dips in Nation's Schools ; Decline in Shootings Attributed to Vigorous, but Often Questioned, Safety Measures
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