'Montreal Shuffle': Why Quebeckers Refuse to Give Up ; in a Country Known for the 'Two Solitudes' of Its French and Anglo Traditions, Canadian Francophones Still Push for Sovereignty

By Walker, Ruth | The Christian Science Monitor, May 11, 2000 | Go to article overview

'Montreal Shuffle': Why Quebeckers Refuse to Give Up ; in a Country Known for the 'Two Solitudes' of Its French and Anglo Traditions, Canadian Francophones Still Push for Sovereignty


Walker, Ruth, The Christian Science Monitor


'Are they still meeting?" the taxi driver asked after his passenger directed him to the congress center where Quebec's governing Parti Qubcois (PQ) was having its convention.

It is possible to impute too much wisdom to taxi drivers, but he clearly was suggesting that the party, and the government in Quebec City, were irrelevant to "real life."

The taxi driver got to this point with his passenger only after a couple of rounds of Montreal shuffle - wherein two Anglos speak to each other in French until one or the other realizes that the conversation would probably proceed more smoothly in English. Sometimes it is the other way round when conversations switch to French.

Either way, once he had ascertained that his passenger was not a Francophone, but a visitor from outside Quebec, he warmed to his topic. "The morning after [Quebec Premier Lucien] M. Bouchard has his next referendum, and wins, there are some guys in New York [who are] gonna give him a buzz. They're gonna call him up and say, "Remember, Lucien, you can't just do what you want, because we own 75 percent of that place."

It is fair to say that Bouchard is familiar with the idea that Wall Street exercises some influence on his government. Over the past few years, he and his team have made many visits to New York to try to shore up their credit rating by convincing market analysts that La Belle Province is still a good investment, within or without Canada.

Sovereignty - or separatism, to put it in terms Americans would recognize - is back as the main issue for the PQ. "It's time for us to go back on the offensive," Bouchard told the convention, whose theme was "Un pays pour le monde" or "a country for the world."

Reelected in November 1998 with a majority of seats, but fewer popular votes than the opposition Liberals, the PQ government seemed like the gang that couldn't shoot straight until just recently. But some labor contract successes and the new something-for-everyone budget in March, among other victories, have left Bouchard smelling like a rose. He won a 91 percent vote of confidence from his party over the weekend.

"We are really in good shape to try again on sovereignty," Louise Beaudoin, Bouchard's minister of international relations, told the Monitor.

The delegates reaffirmed their position that, in the case of a referendum in favor of sovereignty, Quebec should seek to negotiate a political and economic partnership with the rest of Canada - "a partnership that would have political elements," Ms. …

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