The Monitor Guide to the Bestsellers

The Christian Science Monitor, May 11, 2000 | Go to article overview

The Monitor Guide to the Bestsellers


The Monitor's Guide to Bestsellers

HARDCOVER FICTION

1. BEFORE I SAY GOODBYE by Mary Higgins Clark, Simon & Schuster, $26

(Last week 1, Weeks on list 2)

When the yacht holding Adam Cauliff and many of his closest business associates explodes, it leaves more than just a few questions in the air. As his wife, Nell, investigates the business dealings of her husband and the architects with whom he dealt, she faces recurring questions about how well she actually knew her husband - if at all. Clark holds the reigns the whole way through this tale of mischief and secrets, allowing us to unwind her labyrinth of hidden clues only as she wants them to unfold. (320 pp.) By Christy Ellington

2. BACK ROADS by Tawni O'Dell, Viking, $24.95 (Last week 2, Weeks on list 5)

This is a sad story about sad people in a sad land. Harley's young life is altered when his mother goes to prison for killing his abusive father. The young man works heroically to support his three sisters and maintain their home, but as he uncovers the truth about his father's murder, his grasp on reality slips, and by the end his heroism turns tragic. O'Dell's first effort - the Oprah choice for March - is brilliant. The book's murder, sex, and abuse is graphic, but never seems gratuitous. (338 pp.) By Jan Moller

3. THE BLUEST EYE by Toni Morrison, Random House, $15

(Last week -, Weeks on list 1)

Morrison's first novel (1970) tells of an 11-year-old black girl gone mad (Oprah's selection for April). Bearing the brunt of her parents' disappointments and pregnant with her father's child, she is convinced that if only she had blue eyes, her family would find peace, and she herself would be noteworthy. Through her poignant portrayal of each character's loss of innocence, Morrison moves readers beyond pity and blame to compassion and self-examination. A primer on love, hope, fertility, and futility. (224 pp.) By Trudy Palmer

4. THE BRETHREN by John Grisham, Doubleday, $27.95

(Last week 4, Weeks on list 13)

Three federal prison inmates, former judges, design a mail scam to prey on people's most intimate secrets. Their victims, closet homosexuals hoping to find something special with a fictitious character created by the Brethren, are willing to hand everything over to keep their secrets from getting out. Soon, these con men catch the biggest fish of all - the front-runner for the upcoming presidential election. Grisham has done a great job with this story of politics and extortion. (366 pp.) By Anne Toevs

5. THE WEDDING by Danielle Steel, Doubleday, $26.95

(Last week 3, Weeks on list 4)

As an attorney for the stars, Allegra Steinberg deftly supports those who stand directly in the glare of fame. But as her fragile personal life starts to crumble, she learns to turn her attentions inward. When she meets a sincere, handsome writer, she finds true love and discovers compromise. Steel uses Hollywood as an exaggerated backdrop for marriage, the dreams and fears it holds for all of us. But her artificial descriptions (especially of Allegra's beauty) are like plastic figures on a wedding cake. (401 pp.) By Sara Steindorf

6. HUGGER MUGGER by Robert B. Parker, Putnam, $23.95

(Last week 6, Weeks on list 4)

Spencer takes on what first appears to be a mystery for an after- school special. The Boston private investigator is hired to solve a random horse shooting on a Georgia ranch. Of course, the Encyclopedia Brown/Pet Detective plot quickly thickens when the gun points away from the animals and toward their owners. Spencer continues to charm his fans, while Parker remains a cool glass of simplicity in a genre that can be easily overheated by wordy authors. (320 pp.) By Christy Ellington

7. DAUGHTER OF FORTUNE by Isabel Allende, HarperCollins, $26

(Last week 8, Weeks on list 15)

This Oprah book-club selection (Feb. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The Monitor Guide to the Bestsellers
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.