In China, an Example of Safety Taking a Back Seat ; Fingerpointing Follows Monday's Deadly Fire, but Are Reforms Next?

By Smith, Noah J. | The Christian Science Monitor, December 28, 2000 | Go to article overview

In China, an Example of Safety Taking a Back Seat ; Fingerpointing Follows Monday's Deadly Fire, but Are Reforms Next?


Smith, Noah J., The Christian Science Monitor


The Christmas evening conflagration that killed 309 people in central China's Henan Province has prompted President Jiang Zemin to demand severe punishments for those responsible. But it is not clear whether that will be enough to bring about fire-safety measures that could prevent the recurrence of such a disaster.

Lack of smoke detectors, fire alarms, sprinklers, or emergency exits is often the norm in China, despite periodic government fire- safety campaigns - usually begun in the wake of a major disaster.

The Monday night blaze in a Luoyang City shopping and entertainment complex was thought to have begun in faulty electrical wiring two floors below ground level, but the more than 200 Christmas revelers in a fourth-floor discotheque were not warned in time. Dozens of ambulances from the city's hospitals lined up outside in vain, as only seven people were able to escape the building by shattering windows and jumping to air mattresses below. Other victims were mostly construction workers who had been finishing renovations on a different floor.

The Luoyang fire was the country's most destructive in four years, but high death tolls are still not uncommon in China.

Entertainment centers, shopping malls, and apartment blocks throughout the country frequently lack alarm systems and typically padlock all exits, save one where a guard is present. At night, even in dormitories and apartment towers, doors will be locked for security reasons with the only key in the hands of a doorman. Only some of the buildings put up in recent years are equipped with fire detection and prevention systems.

A cinema blaze in May killed 74 patrons when none could kick down the theater doors, locked to deter sneaks. That accident also occurred in Henan Province, China's most populous.

The government metes out heavy penalties up to life imprisonment as punishment for those deemed responsible in high-profile tragedies, such as the Henan blaze in May, but serious attention to fire prevention is difficult to come by where local officials often work hand-in-glove with proprietors.

Official state media reported that several people had been arrested in connection with Monday's fire, and that about 20 suspects are under "close surveillance."

The owners of Luoyang complex had been warned about the building's poor fire-safety facilities beginning in 1997, state media said. …

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