Congress Takes Aim at Modern-Day Slavery ; Traffickers in Human Cargo for Sex Trade or Sweatshops Will Face Tougher Penalties

By Gail Russell Chaddock writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, October 18, 2000 | Go to article overview

Congress Takes Aim at Modern-Day Slavery ; Traffickers in Human Cargo for Sex Trade or Sweatshops Will Face Tougher Penalties


Gail Russell Chaddock writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


Bipartisan coalitions have not been a feature of the fiercely partisan 106th Congress. But lawmakers on both sides of the aisle came together last week with nearly unanimous votes to curb the global scourge of trafficking in persons.

From Burmese girls lured to brothels in Thailand, Ukrainians to Bosnia, or Nepalese to India - recent estimates range from hundreds of thousands to millions of people forced into prostitution and sweatshops worldwide. That includes as many as 50,000 people, mainly women and children, trafficked into the United States each year.

"This is the most significant human rights legislation this Congress," says Sen. Sam Brownback (R) of Kansas, a sponsor. "We're the first nation in the world to go after sex trafficking aggressively and openly, both domestically and internationally."

Until now, law enforcement efforts in the US and abroad have largely punished the victims of trafficking, who are targeted as illegal aliens or prostitutes. Those who go to the police for help are often deported without further assistance, while traffickers escape or face only minor charges.

The new law gives the president and US law enforcement tools to go after traffickers and governments that allow them to operate with impunity. These include:

* Tough penalties for traffickers, including life imprisonment for sex-trafficking in children.

* Visas for trafficking victims who cooperate with law enforcement, capped at 5,000 a year.

* Assistance for victims, regardless of their immigration status.

* Data collection and reporting on trafficking in the US and abroad.

* A requirement to withhold some forms of US foreign assistance from countries that do not make significant efforts to address the problem.

For activists, who waited outside the Senate chambers during the historic vote, the 95-to-0 tally signifies how far public thought has come toward respecting the rights of women and children.

"Violence against women is not personal. It's not about culture or ethnicity. It's a violation of basic human rights, and it should be protected both nationally and internationally," says Eleanor Smeal, president of the Feminist Majority Foundation, an advocacy group based in Arlington, Va.

But lawmakers who sponsored this legislation say the unanimous vote belies how difficult it was to move these issues forward.

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