Louisiana Links Blacks to Their French Roots ; the State Has Recruited French Teachers from the Caribbean and Africa to Promote Creole Heritage

By Simpson, Doug | The Christian Science Monitor, November 24, 2000 | Go to article overview

Louisiana Links Blacks to Their French Roots ; the State Has Recruited French Teachers from the Caribbean and Africa to Promote Creole Heritage


Simpson, Doug, The Christian Science Monitor


When Alain Avognon scans his Louisiana classroom, he sees the descendants of his fellow Africans.

A native of the tiny coastal nation of Benin, the French teacher knows that his homeland was at the center of the slave trade centuries ago - and he knows that many of those slaves ended up working the fields and groves of Louisiana. Today, he feels like he's bringing his fourth-graders closer to their ancestors, many of whom spoke some form of French.

"I look at them and I say to myself, 'I'm teaching them the language of their great-grandparents,' " says Mr. Avognon. "There's a French legacy here in New Orleans, and I'm trying to rejuvenate that legacy."

That legacy is the main reason Avognon came to Louisiana. In a new effort to encourage black children to study French, the state recruited him and more than 40 other black native French speakers to teach their language in south Louisiana's public schools. During the past two years, the search has spread to the Caribbean and even far-off countries like Cameroon.

This quest to rekindle pride in the past through language stretches well beyond the Bayou State. From the Navajos in Arizona and the Abenaki of Vermont to Hawaiians on the big island, groups are using ancestral tongues to strengthen ties to their cultural heritage.

Indeed, the new recruiting in Louisiana has been driven by the concern that blacks have become disconnected from the state's French culture. In the 19th century, a majority of south Louisiana's blacks spoke Creole, a language partly derived from French. But now, most black children are far removed from their families' French-speaking roots: They consider French a language for whites.

"A lot of these kids have never seen a black person speak French, so they don't identify with the language, they don't think it's for them," says W. Paul Cluse, president of Creole Inc. "Of course, teachers of European descent can do a great job with black kids, too, but having a black teacher can really kindle their interest in French."

Like many other cultural elements in the deep South, French in Louisiana developed differently among blacks and whites. Cajun French, which linguists consider a dialect of Parisian French, developed among whites who immigrated to rural south Louisiana from French Canada in the 1700s.

Creole was created out of the swirl of languages - French, Spanish, and the slaves' African tongues - that came together on Africa's Gold Coast and in the Caribbean at the height of the slave trade. Because so many slaves poured into the port of New Orleans in the 18th and 19th centuries, a distinct version of Creole developed in south Louisiana. …

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