Happy New Year! Your 401k Is Tanking

By Perlmutter, David D. | The Christian Science Monitor, January 31, 2001 | Go to article overview

Happy New Year! Your 401k Is Tanking


Perlmutter, David D., The Christian Science Monitor


My pension fund's year-end portfolio summary ended on a chirpy note: "All of us at _____ send best wishes for a healthy and happy New Year!" This uplifting message was undermined by the tables of figures revealing that, despite 12 months' worth of my own and my employer's contributions, my retirement savings had about broken even in 2000.

I'm not alone. Over the last two weeks many middle-class Americans have been staring drop-jawed at the red-inked reports put out by mutual and pension-fund managers.

Call it 401k shock, and how we react - with panic, pessimism, indifference, or blame-seeking - will have major consequences for the political and financial future of the country. This is because economics is actually a subfield of psychology. Perceptions drive spending, which drives the economy. The boom of the last decade was largely fueled by consumers splurging more (including on stocks) and saving less because of high confidence in the future.

Now, according to surveys of consumer confidence, people are beginning to feel pessimistic. Last week's ABC News-Money Magazine poll scored the consumer confidence index at its lowest point in the last three years. The "R" word is common on Main Street, Wall Street, and Capitol Hill.

And my friend Tony is worried. Tony, I should note, is my barometer of Americans' economic perceptions. He lives in another state, but we talk on the phone every month or so. Invariably, he sneaks in some boast about his skillful investing.

In our last conversation, however, after Tony had gotten his own 401k portfolio summary with "best wishes for a healthy and happy New Year," his mood was dark. His retirement savings had shrunk, mostly because he had allocated to aggressive (read: riskier) funds.

"How will I tell my wife that we lost a couple of rungs on the wheel?" he moaned.

This is a recurrent joke that Tony and I share about retirement. Picture a huge gerbil wheel on which you keep spinning, hoping it will take you forward. Or, as in Tony's case, squeaking backward. Worse, Tony's financial planning software calculated that if his pension fund prospered at this pace he would have to delay retirement until the year 2250. …

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