Canadians Wrestle over Sharing Their Water ; for Canadians, the Thought of Exporting Their Crystalline Waters Verges on Heresy

By Coulter, Diana | The Christian Science Monitor, April 16, 2001 | Go to article overview

Canadians Wrestle over Sharing Their Water ; for Canadians, the Thought of Exporting Their Crystalline Waters Verges on Heresy


Coulter, Diana, The Christian Science Monitor


When Ian MacLaren wants students to drink in the essence of being Canadian, the Canadian studies professor lines them up in sturdy canoes and sends them down an Alberta river. Before long, paddling along in silence, most of them understand. "Water is a key to who we are," says Mr. MacLaren.

This country's vast network of lakes and rivers - where 20 percent of the world's fresh water supply flows - has long inspired reverence in its people. When Canadians want solace, refuge, or rejuvenation, many make pilgrimages to cottages, cabins, or beaches next to shimmering waters. The federal government has a link on its website called "Water and the Canadian Identity."

Perhaps that's why it's considered a form of heresy for Canadians to suggest exporting their fresh water in bulk to less-blessed countries. A Newfoundland business group's recent campaign to export the precious stuff has been received as warmly as an Arctic blast, blowing gales of opposition over the nation.

In a scheme backed by Premier Roger Grimes, the McCurdy Group wants to pump as much as 13 billion gallons of pristine water every year from Gisborne Lake, in the province's southeast corner. Tanker trucks and ships would haul the water to the United States and abroad.

The group claims the plan could bring the province as much as C$20 million (US$13 million) in royalties, enough to offer free tuition to Newfoundland's university students.

To the Council of Canadians, a nationalist lobby group, this suggestion is "an unacceptable outrage." Alexa McDonough, a federal party leader, is demanding action to protect "something as fundamentally important to Canadians as water." Another politician warns Newfoundland that it is "opening the floodgates to the international trade of water."

Opponents argue that if one province allows bulk water exports, the federal government will be hard pressed to stop foreign countries from pumping other lakes in Canada. The nation's hallowed waters would become a commodity, subject to international trade rules. …

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