Media Learn Lesson from Moscow: Don't Criticize ; in Russia's Heartland, Journalists Worry about Press Freedoms, Which Hinge on Support of Local Leaders

By Weir, Fred | The Christian Science Monitor, April 23, 2001 | Go to article overview
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Media Learn Lesson from Moscow: Don't Criticize ; in Russia's Heartland, Journalists Worry about Press Freedoms, Which Hinge on Support of Local Leaders


Weir, Fred, The Christian Science Monitor


A Kremlin-backed purge of independent media voices in Moscow is just a distant rumbling in Russia's heartland, where most journalists have learned to watch what they say about those in power.

So, it's surprising that Samara, a sprawling, industrial city on the Volga River 600 miles east of Moscow, has several privately owned papers as well as a major TV station. Many journalists here say they have no fear of the kind of clampdown taking place in the capital, which some characterize as as Moscow politics-as-usual. On the other hand, a quick survey of local media reveals none of the kind of tough criticism that recently got the NTV network and two Moscow-based sister publications silenced by a Kremlin-backed push.

At Samarskaya Izvestia, the region's largest-circulation daily, staff say they are free to write, but wouldn't "spit in the well" by offending the local governor or the oil company that owns their paper. "The Russian people elected Vladimir Putin as president," says deputy editor Gennady Subotin. "It was completely wrong of NTV to continue criticizing the authorities after the people had spoken like that."

This attitude is rooted deep in Russia's political culture, says Denis Popov, a reporter with another daily, Volskaya Zarya. "People think democracy means the majority is right, and holding other viewpoints is therefore wrong," he says. "Putin has made it easy for journalists, because they can just go on autopilot."

Samara is far from the worst case among Russia's 89 provinces, where governors often rule like satraps. "There are 89 different political regimes in Russia," says Igor Yakovenko, secretary of the Russian Union of Journalists. "Some of them are harsh dictatorships that crush press freedom, others have leaders that let some pluralism exist. But the signal coming out of Moscow today is telling regional authorities they can deal with the media as they like.

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