Please update your browser

You're using a version of Internet Explorer that isn't supported by Questia.
To get a better experience, go to one of these sites and get the latest
version of your preferred browser:

Coming: Bigger US Role in Schools ; Legislation Is Solidifying in Congress to Give Washington Much More Oversight of Student Academic Achievement

By Gail Russell Chaddock writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, April 26, 2001 | Go to article overview

Coming: Bigger US Role in Schools ; Legislation Is Solidifying in Congress to Give Washington Much More Oversight of Student Academic Achievement


Gail Russell Chaddock writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


Education legislation now taking shape amid intense negotiations between Democratic lawmakers and the White House is likely to fundamentally alter the relationship between the federal government, the states, and America's 14,500 public school districts.

If the legislation passes Congress in coming weeks, which is by no means certain, it will give Washington a greater say in evaluating public-school performance.

This shift in the balance of power - the most significant in a generation - would come with the blessing of President Bush. But the idea of a big federal role is distasteful to many within his own party: For decades, Republican lawmakers have denounced any inkling of federal meddling in the "local" issue of public education.

What might soften the blow for Republicans is another provision embedded in the legislation. It would give states far more flexibility on spending the federal dollars they receive, allowing them to use the education money as they see fit.

This week, though, the bickering has been primarily among Senate Democrats, some of whom worry that students in low-income school districts will be short-changed if states get freer rein on spending. Even so, a consensus is slowly emerging on what is shaping up to be the most ambitious education-reform bill Congress has ever considered. Among the provisions:

* The US Department of Education would use billions in federal funding to encourage states to adopt "proven" educational strategies, such as instruction in phonics.

* States that accept federal education dollars must test students in Grades 3 through 8 annually in math and reading.

* Parents with children in failing schools will get financial help to make choices about how to improve their kids' education, such as hiring tutors or transferring to another school. (The House GOP bill also funds private-school tuition.)

* Washington has the responsibility of ensuring that reforms in the states are actually improving student achievement.

Some of these changes, such as annual state testing, would take effect quickly. Others, such as a $5 billion reading initiative, would take longer to filter into the nation's classrooms.

The biggest change will be how Washington confirms that its dollars are well spent. Currently, states and school districts must show "compliance" with the requirements of more than 50 narrowly targeted programs: Were the funds used for the purpose for which they were designated?

Under the new system, states could use federal funds where they are most needed. At the same time, a broad national test - the National Assessment of Educational Progress is to be adapted to confirm whether the gains that may show up on state tests are real. If not, federal funds may be withdrawn.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Coming: Bigger US Role in Schools ; Legislation Is Solidifying in Congress to Give Washington Much More Oversight of Student Academic Achievement
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.