Vegas Keeps Lights Burning as Tab Soars ; Electric Lights Define Las Vegas, and Even in a Power Crunch, Nevada Isn't about to Let It's Showcase Attraction Go Dark

By Scott, Cathy | The Christian Science Monitor, June 26, 2001 | Go to article overview

Vegas Keeps Lights Burning as Tab Soars ; Electric Lights Define Las Vegas, and Even in a Power Crunch, Nevada Isn't about to Let It's Showcase Attraction Go Dark


Scott, Cathy, The Christian Science Monitor


In energy-starved California these days, it's de rigueur to turn off the lights when they're not in use. And perish the thought of producing more illumination than really necessary: It's become a 40- watt culture.

But when Californians cross the Nevada border for Las Vegas, they see the power crunch in a different light.

Make that a lot of lights.

Miles outside the city, an orange glow can be seen in the sky. As visitors get closer, they come face to face with the almost kaleidoscopic shimmer of the Strip.

Downtown, Glitter Gulch is washed in perpetual daylight, thanks to millions of bulbs and miles of neon tubing. Monster casinos sport sequined facades and blinking marquees.

Some hotels here have made conservation moves, such as efficient bulbs. But dimmer switches aren't part of the plan.

This doesn't mean Nevada has no power concerns. The state, actually, just purchased additional power from Arizona, Colorado, and Utah to prevent rolling blackouts this summer.

But even as power prices here soar, the state is committed to bright lights. After all, that neon shimmer has everything to do with the image of Las Vegas - and with billions of dollars in tourism business that fuels this desert economy.

Of course, keeping the lights on during a region-wide power crunch doesn't come cheap. To cope, some megaresorts are adding a guest surcharge - and businesses and residents alike are being hit with higher energy bills.

Nevada is on the same power grid as California, "but we generate 50 percent of our own power.... The power we generate in southern Nevada is for use in southern Nevada," says Nevada Power spokeswoman Sonya Heading.

Still, casino owners were hit with a 27 percent rate increase earlier this year. Residential customers received a 17 percent increase. Those moves came atop earlier rate hikes.

The total electricity used to light all the downtown hotel- casino exteriors in one year, Ms. Heading says, would power 4,200 homes. Separately on the Strip, the electricity used for hotel- casino facades is enough to power 23,500 homes. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Vegas Keeps Lights Burning as Tab Soars ; Electric Lights Define Las Vegas, and Even in a Power Crunch, Nevada Isn't about to Let It's Showcase Attraction Go Dark
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.