Common Foreign Policy Still Eludes Unified Europe ; Smaller EU States Took Exception to a Meeting on Friday between Britain, France, and Germany

By Peter Ford writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, October 22, 2001 | Go to article overview

Common Foreign Policy Still Eludes Unified Europe ; Smaller EU States Took Exception to a Meeting on Friday between Britain, France, and Germany


Peter Ford writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


If US policymakers had any doubts about how enthusiastically their European allies would line up for the war against terrorism, the past few weeks have put their fears to rest.

Indeed, the divisions among Western countries in the coalition have appeared not between Europe and the United States, but between the big European nations which have military forces to offer and their smaller neighbors who feel left behind.

At their summit in Belgium on Friday, European Union leaders expressed their "total solidarity with the United States" and stated "unequivocally" their "full support for the action being taken against terrorism in all its aspects."

And although some voices have been raised in Europe against the bombing campaign in Afghanistan - mainly by "green" parties and left-wing groups - they remain marginal for the time being.

On the military front, Britain has led the way as the only European nation so far to have directly participated in the missile strikes against Taliban targets and Osama Bin Laden's camps in Afghanistan.

But France too is eager to join in, probably using its highly trained special forces.

"It is possible that French special forces will be associated with certain actions," French Defense Minister Alain Richard said last week. "We are in the planning phase with our American partner, and there will be successive phases. There are no prior limitations to our participation."

The Italian government offered troops when Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi met President Bush in Washington last week, but appears to have been rebuffed. Italian Foreign Minister Renato Ruggiero told an Italian weekly on Friday that his country would play "a strategically meaningful role in the so-called phase three" of operations in Afghanistan, "after the air raids and ground attacks, when Afghanistan must be pacified."

German Chancellor Gerhard Schroder, meanwhile, has announced that Berlin was ready to provide anti-chemical and anti-biological warfare forces, as well as medical teams, to support US operations in Afghanistan.

That offer to commit combat-ready troops to a troublespot far beyond Europe's borders marks a qualitative leap in German readiness to take on military responsibilities in world affairs.

Ten years ago, during the Gulf War, a more timid German government offered money to pay for the coalition deployment, but no men. Still hobbled by its history, "nobody would have expected from us that Germany would participate in international efforts to secure freedom, justice, and stability other than with secondary efforts," Mr. Schroder told parliament recently. "That era of German post-war policy has irrevocably passed."

If the war against terrorism has given Schroder an opportunity to claim a place for Germany at the top table of international affairs, he has carried his people with him.

Though some leaders of the Greens party - a junior coalition partner in government - have expressed reservations about US raids on Afghanistan, polls show that 65 percent of Germans support their country's participation in military missions.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Common Foreign Policy Still Eludes Unified Europe ; Smaller EU States Took Exception to a Meeting on Friday between Britain, France, and Germany
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.