Jagged History of Jadeite ; the Precious Stone Once Inspired the Plunder of China - Now, the Virtual Enslavement of Burmese

By Currie, Jay | The Christian Science Monitor, March 21, 2002 | Go to article overview

Jagged History of Jadeite ; the Precious Stone Once Inspired the Plunder of China - Now, the Virtual Enslavement of Burmese


Currie, Jay, The Christian Science Monitor


Diamonds may be a girl's best friend, but jadeite is the world's most expensive gem. Found only in a tiny area of northern Burma (Myanmar), jadeite has been treasured for thousands of years. Distinguished chemically from ordinary jade, jadeite is a silicate of sodium and aluminum. Today, single pieces sell for millions of dollars.

"The Stone of Heaven" begins with 18th-century Chinese Emperor Qianlong's obsession with jadeite. He wrote 800-line poems to the stone and had it carved into everything from fingernail protectors to treasure boxes. He ate crushed jadeite to improve the flow of his chi. (Don't try that at home.) To secure his supply, he threatened the Lord of the Mines, the king of Burma, with invasion unless tribute in jadeite was paid each year.

Authors Adrian Levy and Cathy Scott-Clark, former foreign correspondents for The Sunday (London) Times, recognize that jadeite's legend is intimately woven into the great lootings which punctuate modern Chinese history. French and British forces stormed the emperor's Summer Palace in the 1860 Second Opium War, looting thousands of pieces of jadeite. China's last emperor smuggled stones from the Forbidden City to finance his futile attempts to regain the Celestial Throne. And gorgeous pieces from the Dowager Empress's funeral ended up in Taiwan's National Museum after Chiang Kai-shek authorized the plunder of her tomb. Choice pieces made their way to Madame Chiang's personal collection. …

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