Homing in on Solar Systems That Could Support Life ; Newly Found Solar System Similar to Our Own, Including a Jupiter- Type Planet

By Peter N. Spotts writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, June 14, 2002 | Go to article overview

Homing in on Solar Systems That Could Support Life ; Newly Found Solar System Similar to Our Own, Including a Jupiter- Type Planet


Peter N. Spotts writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


Astronomers hunting for new planets say they have uncovered a solar system that is the closest analogue yet to the system Earth inhabits.

The search, which yielded 15 new planets and 10 new solar systems, is part of a project to select targets for a new generation of space telescopes that will look for planets from orbit.

Computer simulations suggest that the system around 55 Cancri, a star in the constellation Cancer, would be capable of holding an Earth-sized planet in a stable orbit within the narrow range of distances that would allow liquid water on the surface. Water is a necessary ingredient for organic life.

"We haven't found an exact solar-system analogue," says Paul Butler, an astronomer at the Carnegie Institution of Washington and one of the leaders of the planet-hunting team. "But this one shows we are getting close."

The Jupiter-class object is one of 13 new planets the team announced. Ten of these represent newly discovered solar systems.

The finds bring the total number of "extrasolar" planets to more than 90. They are the latest results from a broad ground-based effort to hunt for planets orbiting 2,000 stars within about 150 light-years of Earth.

Led by University of California at Berkeley astronomer Geoffrey Marcy and Dr. Butler, the project has 1,200 stars under surveillance. That number is expected to grow as new telescopes join the search. In addition to the telescopes in Hawaii, California, and Australia it currently uses, the group hopes to enlist the 6.5- meter Magellan telescope in Chile to help cover the Southern Hemisphere's skies.

Moreover, the group has recently received full funding to build a $5 million, 2-meter class telescope at the Lick Observatory in California, which could begin operation in a little more than a year.

"This telescope will be optimized for planet hunting. It will be a lean, mean planet-hunting machine," says Debra Fischer, another team member from UC Berkeley.

When astronomers train these telescopes on a candidate star, they don't see the planet itself. Instead, they detect its gravitational effects on the parent star.

Dr. Marcy and Butler's team, which announced its results yesterday at a NASA briefing, uses spectrographs to measure the Doppler shift of light that appears as a planet tugs on its parent star. The star, 55 Cancri, is 41 light-years away. …

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Homing in on Solar Systems That Could Support Life ; Newly Found Solar System Similar to Our Own, Including a Jupiter- Type Planet
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