What to Wear in Australia? A Trendy Beanie, of Course ; Central Australian Aborigines Keep Everything from Car Keys to Photos of the Grandkids under Their Beloved Beanies

By Donnan, Shawn | The Christian Science Monitor, July 3, 2002 | Go to article overview

What to Wear in Australia? A Trendy Beanie, of Course ; Central Australian Aborigines Keep Everything from Car Keys to Photos of the Grandkids under Their Beloved Beanies


Donnan, Shawn, The Christian Science Monitor


The sunburnt, red landscape of central Australia is usually celebrated for its unrelenting heat. But at this time of year - winter in the Southern Hemisphere - it's the cold that rules.

And for many people that means one thing: beanie season.

If you use the definition of the organizers of Alice Springs' just-concluded annual Beanie Festival, a beanie is "any head gear whose primary function is warmth."

But that doesn't mean people here settle for austere wool noggin warmers that you'd wear through a New England winter.

A good beanie is handmade, colorful, bound to inspire giggles and rivalries and, occasionally, even a good debate.

Like many things in this part of the world, it's in Aboriginal culture that the cult of the beanie has many of its roots.

All over central Australia - in summer as well as winter - Aboriginal women young and old sport beanies. In many cases, beanies are for them what a purse is to their counterparts in the developed world, a fashionable yet handy keep-all.

"You'll say 'have you got the keys to the car?' And they'll rip off their beanies and the keys will be right there on top of their head," says Adi Dunlop, a crafts teacher who heads the Beanie Festival's organizing committee. "I've even met one old Aboriginal lady who keeps pictures of her grandchildren in her beanie."

For a traditionally nomadic people who have wandered the outback for some 60,000 years - making Aboriginal culture the oldest still enduring - the beanie is considered a relatively recent arrival, according to Ms. Dunlop.

But is it really?

For years, the consensus has been that beanies were born on Christian missions set up in the outback in the 1930s and at sheep stations in South Australia, where Aborigines were taught to work with wool.

But that isn't necessarily the Aboriginal version. Many people now say they brought their own weaving tradition to the missions and, as Dunlop says, "Aboriginal people can't imagine a time when they didn't have beanies. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

What to Wear in Australia? A Trendy Beanie, of Course ; Central Australian Aborigines Keep Everything from Car Keys to Photos of the Grandkids under Their Beloved Beanies
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.