Iran Quietly Signals an Openness to Terror Fight ; Iran Steps Back from the 'Axis' by Handing over Al Qaeda Suspects

By Scott Peterson writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, August 13, 2002 | Go to article overview

Iran Quietly Signals an Openness to Terror Fight ; Iran Steps Back from the 'Axis' by Handing over Al Qaeda Suspects


Scott Peterson writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


Iran - a nation branded by George W. Bush as part of an "axis of evil" - is signaling to Washington that some Iran-US interests dovetail in America's "war on terror."

Iran's low-key handover to Saudi Arabia of 16 Al Qaeda suspects is a deliberate message to the US that may hint at future neutrality - if not actual cooperation - in any US military action against Iraq, say Iranian and Western analysts.

Iran was aware that the US would be given any information gleaned from the Al Qaeda fighters, who entered Iran from Afghanistan over several months and were expelled in June, said the Saudi foreign minister, Prince Saud al-Faisal, in interviews with The Washington Post and ABC News over the weekend.

"This is very significant: Tehran did this deliberately, as a sign to Washington that Iran is serious about combating terrorism, and handing over Al Qaeda members," says Sadiq Zibakalam, a political scientist at Tehran University in Iran. "It is a gesture of goodwill from Tehran to Washington... and shows that some of the charges that President Bush levels at the Islamic regime about supporting terrorism are inaccurate."

President George W. Bush in January called Iran part of an "Axis of Evil," along with Iraq and North Korea, despite months of secret Iranian intelligence help provided to US forces during the Afghanistan campaign last fall. At that time, American and Iranian diplomats alike hoped those links might evolve into a mechanism for eventual rapprochement.

Instead, the Pentagon accused Iran of meddling in Afghanistan, an arms shipment with Iranian ties was found en route to Palestinian militants, and Mr. Bush coined the "Axis of Evil."

Hope amid hostility

Since then, hostile rhetoric has barely wavered. US officials accuse Iran of seeking weapons of mass destruction and want to scuttle a Russian contract to build Iran's first nuclear power plant.

"At the beginning of last December, Iranians would have been open to the same kind of cooperation on Iraq as they turned out to be on Afghanistan, but they revised their view in light of the nose-dive in relations," says Rosemary Hollis, an analyst at the Royal Institute of International Affairs in London.

"The question is: Would [Iran] be hostile to US action?" asks Ms. Hollis. "They are still giving indications that, if the US played it right, they could actually be helpful."

If the handover of Al Qaeda fighters to Saudi Arabia is read that way, Hollis adds, "I don't think [the Iranians] will mind."

Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld earlier this year accused Iran of being "permissive" in allowing Al Qaeda and Taliban fighters to seek refuge in Iran. …

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