Lunch with John Gould

The Christian Science Monitor, November 15, 2002 | Go to article overview

Lunch with John Gould


It was a memorable, even historic, gathering in the seacoast town of Rockport, Maine. John Gould; his wife, Dorothy; their daughter, Kathy; friends; and various editors - past and present - from The Christian Science Monitor gathered to honor Mr. Gould for his 60 years with the newspaper. (That is a record, as far as we've been able to determine.)

The location was a banquet room at The Samoset Resort. Windows filling one side of the room looked out across the ocean to Mt. Desert Island, Deer Isle, and Blue Hill, Maine. It was a beautiful setting, a beautiful day.

After a sumptuous buffet lunch (the lobster-corn chowder was especially good), guests stood to honor John. Among the attendees were five Home Forum editors, past and present; the Goulds' daughter, Kathy; and Monitor editor Paul Van Slambrouck. Mr. Van Slambrouck presented John with a plaque that read:

"Presented with much gratitude to John Gould, master essayist, in honor of his 60 years of Down East wit and wisdom in The Christian Science Monitor." Mr. Gould's first regular column for the Monitor appeared on Oct. 21, 1942.

"It's an honor for John," said Owen Thomas, editor of The Home Forum page, on which Gould's columns appear every Friday, "but it's also a rare privilege for us to be able to stand and tell John how appreciated he is, how good he is at what he does, and how many people he has blessed over the years."

After others had risen to salute him, John had a few words to say. …

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