Big Teacher Gap Now Filling in ; New York, Atlanta, and Oakland Are among Cities Making Much-Needed Recruiting Gains

By Mark Sappenfield writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, December 26, 2002 | Go to article overview

Big Teacher Gap Now Filling in ; New York, Atlanta, and Oakland Are among Cities Making Much-Needed Recruiting Gains


Mark Sappenfield writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


Faced with the prospect of broad cuts as states fall deeper into deficit, many school districts nationwide can look to at least one positive trend: an easing of the teacher shortage this year.

From Buffalo, N.Y., to the San Francisco Bay Area, a host of cities and states are finding more qualified teachers - at a time when the shortage was expected only to grow more severe.

The economy has played a part, as workers seek more secure jobs and cuts leave fewer positions to fill. Americans' post-Sept. 11 desire for more meaning has driven some to teaching, as well. But a new emphasis on recruiting and retention is also showing encouraging results.

The development is of crucial importance to American education. The success of education reforms across the country - from smaller class sizes to standardized testing - depends largely upon having enough good teachers in the classroom. Indeed, states could lose billions in federal money if they do not meet new teacher standards.

Not every city has had a problem, but the shortages in some areas remain far from over.

"There is still a lot of work to be done," says Mildred Hudson, head of Recruiting New Teachers in Belmont, Mass. But "districts are learning from each other and incorporating lessons learned."

Among the signs of progress:

* Buffalo has reduced its number of uncertified teachers by more than one-third since March. School officials there hope to have every teacher certified by next school year.

* New York City hired more than 8,000 new teachers for this school year, nearly filling a teacher shortage that had persisted for years. And 90 percent of the new teachers were certified, up from 50 percent in 2001.

* Atlanta-area school officials point to Gwinnett County as an indicator of their improving fortunes. Last July, they needed 200 teachers for the coming year. This July, the number was 92.

* Hawaii's Education Department reports 136 teacher vacancies this year, down from more than 400 last year.

* California saw the number of credential waivers it handed out - allowing uncertified Californians to teach as an emergency stopgap - drop by 17 percent between 2000 and 2001. In Oakland, the number of uncertified teachers dropped from 540 in late 1999 to 35 at the start of this school year.

To educators, the trend is encouraging. But they strike a strong note of caution. Chronic shortfalls in teachers for special education, math, and science continue, as do shortages in inner cities and rural areas.

Some places have simply lowered their standards to fill slots, critics add, and even so, the need for teachers remains higher than normal across the board. …

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