Signature Laws That May Not Leave Signature ; Hard Part for Campaign Finance, School, and Corporate Reform Is Implementation

By Gail Russell Chaddock writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, November 29, 2002 | Go to article overview

Signature Laws That May Not Leave Signature ; Hard Part for Campaign Finance, School, and Corporate Reform Is Implementation


Gail Russell Chaddock writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


One of the most frequently cribbed lines on Capitol Hill is a comment widely attributed to the 19th century German statesman Otto Von Bismarck: If you like laws and sausages, you should never watch either one being made.

But for three of the signature legislative reforms of the 107th Congress - education, campaign finance, and corporate accountability - the tough part is making sure the new laws take effect.

Already, each faces looming obstacles:

* For education, it's convincing 50 states and 14,859 school districts to change the way they test and teach children.

* For campaign finance reform, it's surviving an epic court battle - and curbing the new strategies already proliferating to evade the intent of the new law.

* For corporate accountability, it's finding a team to help restore confidence in Wall Street that the public will find credible.

The history of such laws is a constant effort to find ways around them or through them, says Stephen Hess, senior fellow at the Brookings Institution.

Unlike campaign-finance and corporate-accountability reforms, the education law comes with the full support of the Bush administration. President Bush calls the No Child Left Behind Act "the cornerstone of my administration."

As drafted, it's a dramatic bid to use federal-education dollars to leverage better results in the classroom. It requires states to set up their own accountability systems that measure the "adequate yearly progress" of children in Grades 3 to 8. All students are expected to be "fully proficient" in reading and math by the end of the 2013-14 school year. As an incentive, Washington is increasing education aid to states and local school districts by 40 percent this year - the highest increase ever.

This week, the Education Department issued final regulations to implement the law. They require states to submit a plan by Jan. 31 to show how they will meet new requirements. It will be a stretch. Some 17 states are still not in compliance with the last big education reauthorization in 1994, which required states to set academic standards and create a system to measure whether students are proficient in them. This administration promises they will not be swayed by political pressure from governors to ease up on the terms of the law.

"We're pleased to see that the department has held firm on the law's accountability requirements," says Kati Haycock, director of the Education Trust, a lead supporter of the reform.

However, one big loophole is already beginning to surface: Some states, including Louisiana, Colorado, and Connecticut, are lowering the threshold for what it means to be proficient. If this trend continues, it could blunt the impact of the new reform.

"We would like to think that the response to this law would be to meet the challenge, rather than to duck it," says Deputy Secretary Eugene Hickok.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Signature Laws That May Not Leave Signature ; Hard Part for Campaign Finance, School, and Corporate Reform Is Implementation
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.