Modigliani's Balanced Primitivism

By Andreae, Christopher | The Christian Science Monitor, February 27, 2003 | Go to article overview
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Modigliani's Balanced Primitivism


Andreae, Christopher, The Christian Science Monitor


Jean Cocteau hit the nail on the head when he described Amedeo Modigliani's portraits as "not the reflection of his external observation, but of his internal vision...." Today, decades after surrealism made art out of subconscious impulses, this assessment might seem a truism. Since when was art not about "internal vision"?

But the Italian-born artist's short career ended in 1920 (before surrealism truly began), and his art was seen as a significant part of the avant-garde revolution that shook traditional concepts to their roots in the early 1900s.

Modigliani was linked fraternally with such principal shakers of the time as Matisse, Picasso, Derain, Soutine, De Chirico, Vlaminck, and, portrayed here, the sculptor Lipchitz. Many of these daring "Parisian" artists, like him, were foreigners; many were also Jewish, as he was. They lived and worked in the area of Paris called Montparnasse. Modigliani made portraits of many of them.

The current exhibition, "Modigliani and The Artists of Montparnasse," is at the Kimbell Art Museum in Fort Worth, Texas, until May 25.

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