A Large-Scale Battle over a Small Cross ; Court Case Tests Whether a Cross in the Mojave National Preserve Breaches the Church-State Wall

By Daniel B. Wood writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, May 6, 2003 | Go to article overview

A Large-Scale Battle over a Small Cross ; Court Case Tests Whether a Cross in the Mojave National Preserve Breaches the Church-State Wall


Daniel B. Wood writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


Perched on a wind-swept rock jutting 30 feet above the Mojave National Preserve, the monument looks like a headless man in an ugly suit. It's actually a six-foot cross - covered, by court order, with brown canvas - at the root of a debate over the separation of church and state.

The Mojave Cross has sparked a First Amendment battle stretching from here to Congress over what constitutes religious symbolism and what is just plain historic. Civil libertarians say the outcome could have repercussions for dozens of other cases, ranging from the use of Confederate symbols on Civil War battlefields to the development of national park land.

The hollow crucifix has stood in this gusty-dusty corner of California since a group of World War I veterans built it as a memorial in 1934. Situated in a wide expanse of arid desert, the cross is about 20 feet off a two-lane highway where perhaps 20 cars pass a day.

"You don't even see it unless you are looking up at the right place," says Wanda Sandoz, a native to the area.

The American Civil Liberties Union filed suit against the National Park Service in March 2001, saying the cross violates the First Amendment because it is a "religious fixture" on federal land.

A blow to local veterans

A federal judge agreed, crushing local veterans who claim the cross is a historic monument, not an ecclesiastical object.

Over the years, people have gathered at the cross for services and social gatherings. But, although it is a Christian symbol, they don't regard its purpose as primarily religious, says Ms. Sandoz.

"This is just veterans' simple way of saying we honor those who have died for this country," she says.

The federal judge ruled, however, that the US Supreme Court's interpretation of the "establishment clause" of the Constitution means "the government may not promote or affiliate itself with any religious doctrine or organization."

While that decision is on appeal, the crucifix remains covered, flapping in the wind, while controversy swirls around it.

A battle on Capitol Hill

The newest wrinkle in the story is that local US Rep. Jerry Lewis (R) is proposing a mini land swap that would exchange five acres of private land for the half-acre surrounding the cross. …

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