Off to College to Major in ... Video Games? ; 'Video Game Studies' May Sound Oxymoronic, but Academia Is Beginning to Take It Seriously

By Mark Clayton writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, August 29, 2003 | Go to article overview
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Off to College to Major in ... Video Games? ; 'Video Game Studies' May Sound Oxymoronic, but Academia Is Beginning to Take It Seriously


Mark Clayton writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


Always pressing forward to new intellectual frontiers, American higher education is now probing an academic realm sure to produce the words that will thrill parents: "Mom, Dad, I've decided to major in video games!"

That's right. Mario, Luigi, and their compatriots from the world of PlayStation and Xbox - who for years have been familiar faces of student dorm life - are jumping to the next level in higher education: the classroom.

Long the bane of professors who'd rather students do less game- console thumb-clicking and more schoolwork, video games are entering the curriculum and the realm of academic research - to the cheers of some and the boos of others.

Indeed, "video game studies" is an oxymoron to many faculty. As a result, the study of video games - in computer science, art, and sociology - is often cloaked in euphemisms such as "interactive media" or "digital arts." .

"I call it 'the medium that dare not speak its name,' " says Celia Pearce of the Game Culture & Tech Lab at the University of California at Irvine. "Nobody wants to call it 'games,' so they call it something ... acceptable for the academic palate."

Recently, though, video games seem to be gaining academic stature - perhaps enough to dispense with the euphemisms.

This fall, Southern Methodist University in Dallas will enroll 32 students in its new 18-month master's level certificate program in video-game design. Shawnee State University in Portsmouth, Ohio, is offering for the first time a full-blown undergraduate major in "game and simulation arts" as part of its bachelor of fine arts degree program.

A few big-name universities are toying with the serious side of video games. The Massachusetts Institute of Technology, the Georgia Institute of Technology, and Carnegie Mellon University offer curricula on video-game criticism, games as educational tools, and game design.

Georgia Institute of Technology started a PhD program in digital media and a master's in information design and technology, in which many students are pursuing video-game design.

Not everyone buys the idea. Adding video games to the curriculum is merely pandering to students and will lead to an "intellectual devolution," says Edward Smith, director of American Studies at American University.

"It's just another concession to the customer," he says. "Kids have grown up playing Nintendo. They don't read because they don't know how to read - they don't cultivate the imagination.... They need to be put through the intellectual rigors of a traditional format for education. Video games are just an easy way to avoid it."

People who teach video-game studies know it'll be a challenge to prove the validity of their field.

"There's a generational divide," says James Paul Gee, an education professor and author of "What Video Games Have to Teach Us About Learning and Literacy.

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