Concern over Spread of Biodefense Labs ; Grants to Universities to Study Viruses Such as Anthrax Trouble Communities

By Brad Knickerbocker writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, September 25, 2003 | Go to article overview

Concern over Spread of Biodefense Labs ; Grants to Universities to Study Viruses Such as Anthrax Trouble Communities


Brad Knickerbocker writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


While the hunt for "weapons of mass destruction" continues in Iraq, the United States is moving rapidly to counter the possibility of a biological attack here.

Congress and the President have added billions to the effort. Federal agencies are redoubling their efforts. University labs are hustling to win government research grants.

"We have moved with unprecedented speed and determination to prepare for a bioterror attack or any other public-health crisis ,since the attacks of 2001," Health and Human Services Secretary Tommy Thompson said recently. Secretary Thompson was announcing $350 million in federal grants to eight biodefense programs - most of them university-based - around the country.

But that speed and determination is seen by some as a dangerous rush that could in fact increase the risk of harm from biological agents at home and undermine international law abroad. As a result, critics in communities around the country are raising alarms, urging local leaders to resist new biodefense labs and filing lawsuits.

In Boston, a coalition of community groups has just announced plans to sue the Boston University Medical Center, which is bidding for federal funds to build a biodefense lab. Concerned about health and safety risks, opponents say BU's plan violates state environmental laws.

"We have repeatedly requested, and been denied, information and a real dialogue about the threats posed by the lab," says Klare Allen, an organizer with Alternatives for Community & Environment in Boston. "Now we go to court to stop the project."

Citing US environmental law, community groups in California and New Mexico are suing to stop the expansion of biodefense facilities at federal- government laboratories in those states. The city council in Davis, Calif., has gone on record as opposing efforts by the University of California there to obtain federal funding for biodefense research.

Meanwhile, the University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston has been fighting freedom-of-information requests for details of its biodefense research.

"What I'm trying to do here is set what could be become national transparency standards in [federally funded] labs," says Edward Hammond of the Sunshine Project, a biotechnology watchdog organization in Austin. So far, the Texas Attorney General has sided with those urging transparency.

The Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists reports in its current issue that 30 expanded or new biodefense facilities are being considered nationwide with more than a half-dozen federal agencies, plus universities around the country, involved.

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