Joshua Bolten and Dan Senor

The Christian Science Monitor, October 9, 2003 | Go to article overview

Joshua Bolten and Dan Senor


Joshua Bolten, Director of the Office of Management and Budget, is a graduate of Princeton University and has a law degree from Stanford University Law School.

Prior to moving to the office of OMB, Mr. Bolten was Assistant to the President and Deputy Chief of Staff. He was policy director for the Bush - Cheney presidential campaign.

Before the campaign, Bolten worked for Goldman Sachs International in London.

In the previous Bush administration, he was General Counsel to the US Trade Representative and Deputy Assistant to the President for Legislative Affairs. He also worked on the Hill as counsel to the Senate Finance Committee.

Dan Senor is a key adviser to Ambassador Paul Bremer of the Coalition Provisional Authority in Iraq. Mr. Senor was one of the first American officials in Baghdad after the war ended. Previously, he was an aide to Spencer Abraham during Abraham's term in the US Senate.

On whether reconstruction aid should go to Iraq as a loan, not as a gift:

"Ambassador Bremer [has been] making the case behind closed doors and in public events over the last couple of weeks that if this becomes a loan we will have a Weimar Republic on our hands. We will be loading down the Iraqis with more debt on top of debt reparations they already have and creating a situation that those who want to undermine the reconstruction -- want to undermine the new Iraq -- will be able to capitalize on and blame America and blame the West for saddling their economy with all this debt."

On raising tax on the wealthiest Americans to pay to rebuild Iraq:

(Bolten) "I don't expect that. I can't imagine a situation in which the right thing to do to meet our needs in Iraq is to undermine the US economy. So I don't expect any shift in position on that."

On challenges in getting Congress to approve funds to rebuild Iraq:

(Bolten) "We know we have a politically challenging situation when political opponents decide to compare some element of the spending in the Iraq [aid] package to something we would like to do here in the United States. Because politically you will find it is always easier to persuade your constituents that a water project or an electric project in the [home] district would be better than a water project or an electrical project in Iraq.

And I would say that would be a valid comparison to make if what we were talking about here was the comfort of the Iraqi people or normal foreign development aid. That is not the case here.... The purpose of the Iraq supplemental is not principally to make the Iraqi people more comfortable and make their lives better, although that is an important by-product. The purpose of the Iraq supplemental, both the security side and the reconstruction side is a national security purpose. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Joshua Bolten and Dan Senor
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.