A Boost for Bush, If New Jobs Follow

By Peter Grier and Liz Marlantes writers of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, October 31, 2003 | Go to article overview

A Boost for Bush, If New Jobs Follow


Peter Grier and Liz Marlantes writers of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


The new gross domestic product figures are out, and here's the political bottom line: President Bush's prospects for reelection appear to be rising.

Next November's vote is still a long way off, of course. Even if economic growth continues, Bush could still be the first chief executive since Herbert Hoover to see a net job loss during his time in office.

But there's no way that the best quarterly GDP numbers since Ronald Reagan's presidency aren't good news for the White House. It increasingly appears that as he tries for a second term, Bush may be less vulnerable to attacks on his economic stewardship than he is to criticism about foreign policy. That position is the reverse of what seemed likely only a few months ago.

"The short-term politics of this are favorable to the president and it puts his Democratic critics on the defensive," says Merle Black, a political scientist at Emory University in Atlanta.

The GDP growth of 7.2 percent annual rate for the third quarter was the highest such figure since the first quarter of 1984. It was almost double the 3.3 percent pace registered in the second quarter, and surpassed most analyst's projections.

Among the possible reasons for the performance cited by economists were continued low interest rates and consumer spending fueled by tax cuts.

Administration officials were quick to take credit for the improving economy. The value of US stock markets has gone up by $2 trillion since the beginning of the year, they pointed out, with personal income rising at a 3.8 percent annual rate since January. "Today's report on real GDP in the third quarter shows that the president's economic policies are having a positive impact on the economy," said Treasury secretary John W. Snow.

But others were quick to note that one stunning quarter does not a booming economy make. Nor does it ensure that the economic climate will continue to improve as next year's vote draws nearer.

In terms of forming voter attitudes the most important GDP numbers may be those from the second quarter of next year, which will be issued at the height of the presidential race.

"We could have a scenario where the economy comes back and then drops off again," says Mr. Black of Emory University.

Still, this good quarter will undoubtedly cause problems for Democratic presidential candidates. Many of them have shaped messages and proposed policies on the assumption that Bush might be vulnerable on economic policy - and on the effects of his tax cuts in particular.

Presidential hopefuls

Howard Dean, for example, has hit Bush's stewardship as "Enron economics," and called for a rollback of all the president's tax cuts. Dick Gephardt has similarly called for a complete tax-cut turnabout, saying they have created a fiscal mess that will lead to huge federal deficits for the foreseeable future.

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