Madeline Albright ; Excerpts from a Monitor Breakfast On: Capturing Saddam Hussein, North Korea, and Foreign Fighters in Iraq

By Cook, David T. | The Christian Science Monitor, December 8, 2003 | Go to article overview

Madeline Albright ; Excerpts from a Monitor Breakfast On: Capturing Saddam Hussein, North Korea, and Foreign Fighters in Iraq


Cook, David T., The Christian Science Monitor


Madeline Albright was the nation's 64th Secretary of State and before that United States Permanent Representative to the United Nations.

The Secretary has a B.A. from Wellesley College in Political Science. She studied at the School of Advanced International Studies at Johns Hopkins University and earned her Masters and Doctorate from Columbia University.

Today, Secretary Albright is a principal in her own strategic consulting firm, the Albright Group, as well as a professor at the Georgetown School of Foreign Service and a distinguished scholar at the University of Michigan. She also serves on the board of directors of the New York Stock Exchange.

On the view of America she finds in travels overseas:

"I have never seen in my lifetime the United States at such a low level of regard. We are now viewed - and I am quoting - as a rogue state, as a country that has no ability to understand ... how we affect other countries and do not take into consideration other countries' national interests at all in creating our own which, from my perspective, weakens our argument for national interests. So I think there is a genuine question as to their (Republicans') national security credentials."

On the failure to capture or kill Osama Bin laden and Saddam Hussein:

"Saddam Hussein's continued life is more of a problem than Osama bin Laden's. Because if we look at what has been happening with the insurgency [in Iraq] and stories in the last few days [about] funds that Saddam Hussein somehow has access to ... in many ways he has a lot of levers he was used to pulling. The question is whether the strings are attached... His continued life is creating huge problems. And while the [Bush] administration is basically saying none of this matters any more, I think it does matter. Whether they capture him there is no way of telling. Osama bin Laden ...I think it would be better if Osama bin Laden were captured. That is what they promised us and it hasn't happened."

On the Bush administration's North Korea policy:

"To some extent, the North Korea policy is a victim of internal fighting within the administration....President Bush in his speech in Asia made some interesting, more kind of forward-moving statements about North Korea, the desire to go forward with the six party talks. …

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Madeline Albright ; Excerpts from a Monitor Breakfast On: Capturing Saddam Hussein, North Korea, and Foreign Fighters in Iraq
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