Corruption, Beware ; Rumors of the Death of Investigative Journalism Are Greatly Exaggerated

By Weinberg, Steve | The Christian Science Monitor, November 18, 2003 | Go to article overview
Save to active project

Corruption, Beware ; Rumors of the Death of Investigative Journalism Are Greatly Exaggerated


Weinberg, Steve, The Christian Science Monitor


American history courses across the nation usually devote at least a few minutes to a group of journalists who wrote about 100 years ago and collectively became known as "muckrakers." The best- known of the bunch, then and now, are Lincoln Steffens, Ida Tarbell, Ray Stannard Baker, David Graham Phillips, and Upton Sinclair.

Although Theodore Roosevelt had been friendly with many of these journalists, by 1906 the president believed many of them had become a menace to society. His term "muckrakers" was not meant as a compliment.

Cecelia Tichi, a professor of English at Vanderbilt University, noticed that a number of nonfiction books seemed to echo the old muckrakers' themes and techniques. For this study, she singled out five contemporary books: "Fast Food Nation," by Eric Schlosser; "Nickel and Dimed," by Barbara Ehrenreich; "Betrayal of Trust: The Collapse of Global Public Health," by Laurie Garrett; "No Logo: Taking Aim at the Brand Bullies," by Naomi Klein; and "Going Up the River: Travels in a Prison Nation," by Joseph Hallinan.

Her discussion of the similarities and differences between muckrakers then and now provides an excellent analysis of how the early muckrakers changed magazine and book nonfiction for the better.

Before Tarbell and her colleagues became prominent, most of what passed for investigative reporting (a term unknown in 1900) was at best anecdotal, at worst fictionalized. In her expose of the Standard Oil Company and its driving force, John D. Rockefeller, Tarbell reported meticulously, working with government documents, court cases, and massive interview notes.

The other attraction of Tichi's book is her account of the five contemporary books.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Corruption, Beware ; Rumors of the Death of Investigative Journalism Are Greatly Exaggerated
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.