Mayan Art and Outlook on Display at National Gallery

By Stephen, Katherine | The Christian Science Monitor, April 15, 2004 | Go to article overview

Mayan Art and Outlook on Display at National Gallery


Stephen, Katherine, The Christian Science Monitor


This spring in cultural Washington, D.C., the ancient Mayans rule. The "Courtly Art of the Ancient Maya," a landmark exhibition at The National Gallery of Art, brings this Central American culture to life in the most extensive display of Mayan sculpture, jewelry, and artifacts ever seen in the United States. More than 130 Mayan works of art from collections in Mexico, Central America, Europe, and the US are featured in a show that vividly illustrates the intersection of art with social history.

The complex, highly artistic civilization of the ancient Maya brought culture in the Americas to its apex of development from about AD 600 to 800. The elaborate courts of Mayan city-states in what are now Mexico, Guatemala, and Belize, featured sumptuous surroundings complete with pet jaguars, fan-bearers, and fly-sweeps to attend kings who were regarded as semi-divine. Among their accomplishments, the Mayans devised a sophisticated hierarchical form of government, a polytheistic religion, hieroglyphic writing, and a national sport (now called "the Mesoamerican ballgame") that they endowed with sacred, symbolic dimensions.

The Mayan elite valued artistic and religious expression and often fused the two. Fundamental to Mayan religion and culture was the life cycle of the Maize God. Maize (corn) was the staple of the Mayan diet and was regarded as holy. …

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