China Hums with Change

By Cobban, Helena | The Christian Science Monitor, June 1, 2004 | Go to article overview

China Hums with Change


Cobban, Helena, The Christian Science Monitor


We climbed to the 10th level of the ancient wooden Pagoda of Six Harmonies here, and the views all round were stupendous. To the west rose mist-smudged mountains in the valleys of which nestled the tea gardens that produce China's most sought-after green teas. To the east, across the broad Qiantang River, was the industrial and business center of Hangzhou, a provincial capital 140 miles south of Shanghai. Along just one short section of the horizon 20 huge cranes were at work, lifting concrete to add new ranks of apartment houses, shopping malls, and office complexes to the many the city already boasts.

China's massive economy is humming, and its continuing growth is making waves in the entire global market. In the process, relations among different groups in China; the role of its dominating Communist Party; and the self-image, views, and lifestyle of its 1.3 billion people are changing rapidly.

Indeed, on a recent weeklong stay in Hangzhou and Shanghai, I was struck by how successful China has been - in the three decades since the end of the 1966-1976 Cultural Revolution - in rebuilding both its economy and the educational infrastructure that is so important to its long-term prospects.

For many young people who live along the booming east coast, the privations of the Maoist era seem like ancient history. They dress just like young people in America. Many carry cellphones. Many have bicycles. But the public transport in the big cities is excellent. Beijing has three heavily used subway lines and is building five more - to be completed for the 2008 Olympics there.

In addition, for millions of higher- income citizens, owning a private car is now for the first time an option, and one they are taking up with zest. In Beijing, the city's vast system of eight- lane boulevards frequently comes near complete gridlock, even midmorning. (Several Chinese friends told me last year's SARS epidemic spurred many people who could afford it to buy cars to avoid riding buses and trains.)

I came to China as part of an academic exchange between the University of Virginia and East China Normal University (ECNU), which hosted our party of four on their lovely, parklike campus in western Shanghai, where we met with students and faculty over four days.

One afternoon, a small group of faculty members reminisced about their Cultural Revolution experiences. Two of them, still in school in the 1960s, said they had been caught up in the anti-authority frenzy that Communist national leader Mao Zedong whipped up among young people in those years. Mao actively urged young people to confront, denounce, and even punish their teachers and other authority figures in their lives. Both recalled the headiness of attending mass rallies of the youthful, pro-Mao Red Guards. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

China Hums with Change
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.