The Controversial 'Hammer' on the Hill ; an Ethics Complaint Could Sidetrack Tom DeLay, Regarded as an Exceptionally Effective Majority Leader

By Gail Russell Chaddock and Kris Axtman writers of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, June 24, 2004 | Go to article overview

The Controversial 'Hammer' on the Hill ; an Ethics Complaint Could Sidetrack Tom DeLay, Regarded as an Exceptionally Effective Majority Leader


Gail Russell Chaddock and Kris Axtman writers of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


The beaming bobblehead doll that just arrived in a Capitol Hill bookshop is a far cry from the Tom DeLay once described by Clinton aides as "downright scary, even when he tries to smile" - except for the big hammer clenched in his fists.

"The Hammer" isn't his real nickname, at least not to those who know him. "No one ever comes up to him and says, 'Hey, Hammer!' " says spokesman Jonathan Grella. But the name was coined by the Washington Press corps, and it stuck.

One reason is that Mr. DeLay is on track to become one of the most powerful House leaders ever, unless derailed by the ethics complaint filed last week by a Texas Democrat he helped defeat. On Tuesday, the House Ethics Committee announced that the complaint by Rep. Chris Bell met House standards and would go forward.

DeLay is not just a feisty pol. He is also a one-man fundraising blizzard, directing millions to candidates and groups committed to maintaining a GOP majority in Congress and state governments.

At issue in the complaint is whether he violated House ethics rules and federal law in the process. Weeks before Representative Bell's complaint, a coalition of public interest groups called on the House to break a longstanding "truce" on ethics and investigate DeLay.

"He is a huge target, because he is so aggressive in pursuing his goals," says Ross Baker, a political scientist at Rutgers University. "Democrats have been forced to absorb a lot of punishment, and ... they feel they need to retaliate."

Since 1998, his leadership political action committee (Americans for a Republican Majority or ARMPAC) has raised over $10 million, more than any leadership PAC on Capitol Hill. He's a virtual investment banker for conservative groups that do not fall under strict federal disclosure rules, such as the Republican Majorities Issues Campaign and the US Family Network. Last month, a charity associated with DeLay, Celebrations for Children Inc., canceled plans for gala events at the Republican National Convention in New York after critics charged that DeLay was using the charity to skirt new campaign-finance laws that bar raising soft money from corporations or trade unions for federal campaigns.

He's also taken hits for his role in micromanaging a new Texas redistricting in 2003, including calling on the Federal Aviation Administration to track Democratic lawmakers fleeing a key vote on the plan. Analysts say the new plan could net the GOP six or seven House seats in November, but set off a firestorm in Texas.

"Redistricting caused an enormous rift in the state legislature, the kind of rift not seen in Texas politics since Reconstruction," says Robert Stein, Rice University social scientist. …

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