More State Laws to Govern Life's Minutiae ; Breath Mints Are No Longer Food in Ohio. Soda Is Banned from California Schools. No Cellphones for N.J. Drivers

By Daniel B. Wood writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, July 6, 2004 | Go to article overview

More State Laws to Govern Life's Minutiae ; Breath Mints Are No Longer Food in Ohio. Soda Is Banned from California Schools. No Cellphones for N.J. Drivers


Daniel B. Wood writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


The flood of new mandates that went into effect this month across the nation prompted one California assemblyman to declare the arrival of a "nanny government" - legislation that replaces the responsibility of parents and common sense to protect the well- being of citizens.

Drivers in New Jersey can no longer talk on cellphones. Dangerous dogs in Colorado must wear microchips at their owner's expense. California junior high students have to wait until after they leave school grounds if they want to drink soda.

But political analysts say that taken en masse, the new laws are a revealing reflection of the day-to-day concerns of Americans trying to cope with the kaleidoscopic permutations of life in the new millennium.

"If you look down this list, you see that state legislatures are trying to tackle the key issues that citizens are struggling with in their lives," says Tim Storey, senior fellow at the National Conference of State Legislatures (NCSL). "It's part of the whole grand notion that the states are laboratories of democracy."

Not every new law is about restrictions. New Georgia laws allow the sale of certain beers with alcohol exceeding 6 percent. Ohio joins more than 50 percent of states allowing liquor sales on Sunday. And New Jersey has expanded states rights for gay couples with a domestic partnership law giving such couples the right to file joint tax returns and make medical choices for each other.

Likewise, several new laws are intended to ratchet up voters' trust in the political system. South Dakota has created a Constitutional Revision Commission to scrutinize the balance of power at the capital. A new Connecticut law bans the use of campaign funds for personal benefit. In Florida, political candidates and their supporters must clearly delineate who has created and paid for ads - including bumper stickers, fliers, and yard signs.

California made history last week with the nation's first family leave law. Workers can take up to six weeks of paid leave in a 12- month period to care for newborn children or seriously ill relatives. Pay, ranging from $50 to $728 per week, is to be funded by the state's disability insurance fund.

"California's new family leave act is one of the nation's most- watched laws kicking in," says Jack Pitney, political scientist at Claremont McKenna University.

But the state chamber of commerce has already expressed concerns that the fund could go broke in the first 12 months.

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