Letters

The Christian Science Monitor, August 3, 2004 | Go to article overview

Letters


Are jobs an effective method of keeping score?

Regarding the article "Jobs, pay, and the score so far" in the July 28 edition: Why can't we see the "half-full picture"? I think we need to focus more on the fact that there have been more jobs created, not the fact that these jobs may not be white-collar jobs. Although people want to improve their economic situation, many are just happy to have work and not have to depend on someone else for their survival and well-being.

I think President Bush is doing a good job of helping America create more employment. He understands that by giving tax money back to the private sector, jobs will be created more efficiently than if the government took the money and created job programs. We can't expect Mr. Bush to be able to employ every American in just four short years. Heather Bake Rexburg, Idaho

One point not addressed in your article: the impact that rising energy prices have had on disposable income. I would argue that my family's tax-cut money has ended up in the pockets of oil and other energy companies. In my view, the Bush administration has responsibility for this issue due to its foreign policy, especially its failures in the Middle East, as well as its lack of vision for the future. I believe the first $100 billion tax cut should have been spent to convert our economy to alternative energy sources, with an eye on reducing our dependence on foreign oil, thereby reducing world demand and positively affecting prices. Vince Ozier Lima, Ohio

Your article reported numbers and opinions about jobs and wages in America. Unfortunately, readers cannot always deduce, from the numbers and opinions reported, the extent of income (and wealth) inequality in America. Nor can we do that from the numbers and opinions cited in many other reports about tax cuts, deregulations, CEO pay, job losses to low-wage states and nations, etc.

The extent of income inequality can be presented. The numbers are in reports called, "Statistics of Income: Individual Tax Returns. …

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