Liberty's Back ; the Famous Symbol of America Reopens to Tourists Tuesday

By Thomas, Owen | The Christian Science Monitor, August 3, 2004 | Go to article overview

Liberty's Back ; the Famous Symbol of America Reopens to Tourists Tuesday


Thomas, Owen, The Christian Science Monitor


Now it is revered as a national symbol, but in the beginning the Statue of Liberty didn't get much respect. France's grand gift of friendship was first greeted with an "it'll never happen" attitude from Americans. When it began to look as though the French were going to pull it off, the project was dismissed as "New York's lighthouse," not a national treasure.

On Sept. 11, 2001, the statue of "Liberty Enlightening the World" (its actual title) was closed to the public. Officials were concerned that the statue would be the target of a terrorist attack.

The statue is scheduled to be reopened Tuesday, though visitors will no longer be able to climb the stairs to the viewing platform in the crown. (The ladder to the torch has been closed since 1916.) Visitors will gaze up into the statue's interior through a thick glass ceiling at the uppermost level of the pedestal. Enhanced lighting and a new video system have been installed. Visitors may walk out onto the pedestal's observation deck once more, but they will have to make reservations to tour inside the pedestal. For the price of a ferry ride anyone can tour Liberty (formerly Bedloe's) Island - and visit the gift shop.

We may have Joseph Pulitzer to thank for the statue being in New York. At one point, funds to build the statue's pedestal had run out, and construction on the barely-begun base had ceased. Meanwhile, workers in France were completing the statue. A committee from Boston reportedly approached the French and offered to host the statue there. San Francisco, Philadelphia, and Cleveland also expressed interest - even Baltimore and Minneapolis. Pulitzer began to campaign tirelessly for the pedestal fund. Within five months, the necessary funds had been raised.

A colossus arises in New York

Summer 1865 Antislavery leader Edouard de Laboulaye conceives the idea for the Statue of Liberty at a gathering in his home near Versailles, France. It is shortly after Lincoln's assassination, an event the French feel deeply. De Laboulaye proposes a very large gift to the United States to honor the historic amitie (friendship) between the two nations. The people of France will create and pay for a statue. The people of America will fund and construct a pedestal for it. Sculptor Frederic Auguste Bartholdi is sent to America to study the situation. By the time he lands in New York, he has an idea.

November 1875 The Franco-American Union is formed to make plans and collect funds. Construction of the statue begins.

January 1877 The American Committee for the construction of the pedestal is created. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Liberty's Back ; the Famous Symbol of America Reopens to Tourists Tuesday
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.