Why Today's Parents Require Better College Orientations

By James Martin and James E. Samels | The Christian Science Monitor, September 14, 2004 | Go to article overview

Why Today's Parents Require Better College Orientations


James Martin and James E. Samels, The Christian Science Monitor


It's mid-September, and across the country, the parents of several million new college students have recently driven away from a college campus after dropping off a son or daughter. Most of them, one hopes, are at least reasonably satisfied that the institution will challenge their child and deliver an appropriate level of care and support when needed.

Yet have these same parents been informed of and had a chance to ask questions about the most serious issues their child will immediately face in adjusting to college?

If they have, it will be because they attended parents' orientation.

Experienced observers on American campuses have begun to notice a new group of mothers and fathers emerging over the past two years. Informally they're being called "helicopter parents" because of the way they hover over their offspring well beyond the standard moment to say goodbye.

In fact, one Boston-area dean of students describes them as the carefully dressed couple who sit in the front row at the first parent orientation session, who hold the dean's hand in any reception line through at least three separate questions, and who then sit in the back row at the first student orientation session.

On one occasion, a couple informed this dean - when they finally did exit - that they had purchased a condominium "in the neighborhood" to be able to monitor their daughter's progress more effectively. Clearly, with parents like these hovering close at hand, colleges and universities should consider themselves warned that life both on and off campus is not what it used to be.

Why are these issues even being raised this fall? Because parents have officially stepped forward as higher education's newest constituency. Effective parent-orientation programs - increasingly complex and comprehensive - are the first and most public steps in acknowledging the importance of their interests. In fact, mothers and fathers are arriving on campus with more serious questions than ever before about the cost of higher education, and what their child's school of choice is doing to earn their dollars.

Among high-profile institutions nationally, few have taken as dramatic steps as has Northeastern University in Boston. Over the past five years, to enhance its image, Northeastern has gone against the grain and boldly recast itself, focusing on national prominence over bulk.

In the mid-1980s, it registered over 30,000 full- and part-time undergraduates; last year, the university enrolled a more selectively chosen 18,000 undergraduates. Along the way, however, many parents have had many questions about life on and off this prominent urban campus. …

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