Why Political Virtue Matters in the Voting Booth

By Hamilton, Lee | The Christian Science Monitor, November 1, 2004 | Go to article overview
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Why Political Virtue Matters in the Voting Booth


Hamilton, Lee, The Christian Science Monitor


When Americans step into the voting booth to choose the people they want representing them in Washington, high on the list of qualities they'll be looking for in the candidates is personal integrity. To be sure, they will weigh other considerations as well - party label, ideology, stands on issues of importance, likability. But for most of us, it's very important to know that the people to whom we entrust our hopes for this nation aren't just in it for themselves.

The Founding Fathers would approve. Indeed, they were quite clear on which particular quality they thought most important in an elected representative: virtue. It's an old-fashioned word that is not much in vogue at the moment, yet in a very real sense, the vitality of our democracy depends on what the Founders meant by it.

Voters today might think of "virtue" in any number of ways: as moral probity, honesty, self-discipline, a sense of responsibility, and, of course, integrity. These are all qualities that citizens look for in their candidates, and understandably so. Yet the Founders had something even larger and more encompassing in mind when they talked about virtue. They were looking for a sense of civic self-sacrifice - the ability to overcome self-interest and act for the benefit of the broader community.

There is nothing old-fashioned about "virtue" when seen in that light. Our Republic functions best when it generates political leaders who are capable of setting aside their own desires for power or partisan domination or pecuniary self-interest. It suffers when our politicians are incapable of doing so.

Of course, the Founders understood human nature. They anticipated that no one could be so virtuous as to be entrusted with unlimited power. That's why they developed a constitutional system of checks and balances aimed at restraining the power of any one person or, indeed, any single branch of government.

Yet the Founders were keenly aware that even this was not enough. They were creating a representative democracy, and in a democracy, power ultimately lies with the electorate. In 1788, at the Virginia Ratifying Convention, James Madison expressed hope "that the people will have virtue and intelligence to select men of virtue and wisdom.

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