Where Minorities Give: Education Is a Top Choice

By Stacy A. Teicher writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, November 22, 2004 | Go to article overview

Where Minorities Give: Education Is a Top Choice


Stacy A. Teicher writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


Linda Randolph got to know Harlem through its children. She trained as a pediatrician there, and her love for the community was still fresh in her mind years later when she became a philanthropist.

"I was always struck by some of the negative stereotypes ... versus what I saw in terms of the strengths of many of the families living in Harlem," she says. "[I realized] that perhaps we weren't capitalizing on those strengths as much as we could, and that there ought to be a way for me personally to give back to the community that helped me to become a doctor."

In 1998 she founded the Fund for Greater Harlem, designed to give grants to unsung heroes who are meeting key needs such as education and healthcare.

Long overlooked, donations by minorities are gaining attention and clout. In the New York metro region, for example, a recent study of 166 donors of color found that their charitable giving in the past year ranged from $200 to $1 million, with the median at $5,000. That's higher than the median for all donors in New York State - about $4,000 - although the interviewees also had incomes that were higher than average.

With African-Americans, Latinos, and Asian-Americans now the majority populations of New York and other large American cities, tapping into their charitable impulses becomes more important.

"What we're seeing is the harvest of the generation that's been able to scale more of the corporate ladders," says Erica Hunt, executive director of The Twenty-First Century Foundation, which focuses on black philanthropy.

After decades of cutbacks in public funding for social services, there's a concerted effort under way to capitalize on their growing affluence. One example is the Coalition for New Philanthropy, which conducted the New York interviews to understand what motivates donors of color - and to promote more-strategic giving.

Schools and other educational programs were the top priorities for many of these donors. More than 60 percent of the African- Americans and Latinos under age 40 gave one of their two biggest gifts to education.

Because so many more educational choices were open to them than to their parents, "there's a focus on disadvantaged young people and how those opportunities can be re-created for coming generations," says Ms. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Where Minorities Give: Education Is a Top Choice
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.