America's First Intelligence Czar ; Bush Thursday Named Negroponte as the Overall Director of Intelligence

By Peter Grier and Faye Bowers writers of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, February 18, 2005 | Go to article overview

America's First Intelligence Czar ; Bush Thursday Named Negroponte as the Overall Director of Intelligence


Peter Grier and Faye Bowers writers of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


As US ambassador to Iraq, John Negroponte already has a tough job. But now he's in line for something that in its own way might be tougher: service as the first US director of national intelligence.

Iraq is dangerous, of course, and its politics intense.

In Washington, however, Ambassador Negroponte may find that the DNI post comes with unprecedented responsibility, and less power than advertised.

If confirmed by the Senate, Negroponte will be expected to set overall budgets for a constellation of US intelligence agencies, many of which might fight major changes he wishes to make.

By law, he'll be the president's chief adviser on intelligence matters - but he'll have no direct control over actual intelligence operations.

What's more, on his very own issues he'll have lots of competition for the president's ear.

"Negroponte is going to have to fend for himself out there, with the ambiguities in the law, and hope he can make it work on the basis of goodwill," says Stansfield Turner, former director of central intelligence.

President Bush announced his pick of Negroponte for the DNI slot at a snap Thursday press conference. It came at a time when the administration was coming under increasing criticism for slowness in trying to fill the job.

On Wednesday, for instance, Sen. John D. Rockefeller IV (D) of West Virginia, the ranking minority member of the Senate Intelligence Committee, complained publicly of "foot-dragging," and called the delay in naming a DNI "simply unacceptable."

In announcing his choice, President Bush said that Negroponte understands the intelligence needs of US policymakers, plus the need to make intelligence agencies work together.

"If we're going to stop the terrorists before they strike, we must ensure that our intelligence agencies work as a single, unified enterprise," said President Bush.

With Negroponte, Bush has a veteran security official whose wide- ranging background may make him an obvious fit for the post.

But Negroponte's confirmation may not be a slam dunk. As ambassador to Honduras from 1981-85, he played a prominent role in aiding the contra rebels in their war with the left-wing Sandinista government in neighboring Nicaragua.

In past some human rights groups have alleged that Negroponte knew about and did not disapprove of the activities of Honduran death squads funded and partly trained by the CIA. Negroponte has testified that he did not believe death squads were operating in Honduras.

He was personally never held responsible for any actions of the death squads, but some officials within the CIA were, and in the early 1990s the US government forced the CIA to change its methods for recruiting and maintaining foreign agents after the abuses became public. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

America's First Intelligence Czar ; Bush Thursday Named Negroponte as the Overall Director of Intelligence
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.